An atheist blogger’s journey to Catholicism: Leah Libresco’s story

H/T: The Deacon’s Bench

From Leah’s Blog at Patheos

This is my last post for the Patheos Atheist Portal

June 18, 2012 By leahlibresco

Update: I’m starting to work through the comments section and respond here.

For several years, a lot of my friends have been telling me I had an inconsistent and unsustainable philosophy.  ”A virtue ethicist atheist whose transhumanism seems to be rooted in dualism?  Who won’t shut up about moral lapses as wounds to the soul and keeps trying to convince us it’s better to be sinned against than sinning?  Who has started talking about mortifying her pride and keeps pulling out Lewis and Chesterton quotes?  C’mon, convert already.”

I could see where they were coming from, but I stayed put.  I was ready to admit that there were parts of Christianity and Catholicism that seemed like a pretty good match for the bits of my moral system that I was most sure of, while meanwhile my own philosophy was pretty kludged together and not particularly satisfactory.  But I couldn’t pick consistency over my construction project as long as I didn’t believe it was true.

While I kept working, I tried to keep my eyes open for ways I could test which world I was in, but a lot of the evidence for Christianity was only compelling to me if I at least presupposed Deism.  Meanwhile, on the other side, I kept running into moral philosophers who seemed really helpful, until I discovered that their study of virtue ethics has led them to take a tumble into the Tiber.  (I’m looking at you, MacIntyre!).

Then, the night before Palm Sunday (I have excellent liturgical timing), I was up at my alma mater for an alumni debate.  I had another round of translating a lot of principles out of Catholic in order to use them in my speech, which prompted the now traditional heckling from my friends.  After the debate, I buttonholed a Christian friend for another argument.  During the discussion, he prodded me on where I thought moral law came from in my metaphysics.  I talked about morality as though it were some kind of Platonic form, remote from the plane that humans existed on.  He wanted to know where the connection was.

I could hypothesize how a Forms-material world link would work in the case of mathematics (a little long and off topic for this post, but pretty much the canonical idea of recognizing Two-ness as the quality that’s shared by two chairs and two houses, etc.  Once you get the natural numbers, the rest of mathematics is in your grasp).  But I didn’t have an analogue for how humans got bootstrap up to get even a partial understanding of objective moral law.

I’ve heard some explanations that try to bake morality into the natural world by reaching for evolutionary psychology.  They argue that moral dispositions are evolutionarily triumphant over selfishness, or they talk about group selection, or something else.  Usually, these proposed solutions radically misunderstand a) evolution b) moral philosophy or c) both.  I didn’t think the answer was there.  My friend pressed me to stop beating up on other people’s explanations and offer one of my own.

“I don’t know,” I said.  ”I’ve got bupkis.”

“Your best guess.”

“I haven’t got one.”

“You must have some idea.”

“I don’t know.  I’ve got nothing.  I guess Morality just loves me or something.”

“…”

“Ok, ok, yes, I heard what I just said.  Give me a second and let me decide if I believe it.”

It turns out I did.

I believed that the Moral Law wasn’t just a Platonic truth, abstract and distant.  It turns out I actually believed it was some kind of Person, as well as Truth.  And there was one religion that seemed like the most promising way to reach back to that living Truth.  I asked my friend what he suggest we do now, and we prayed the night office of the Liturgy of the Hours together (I’ve kept up with that since).  Then I suggested hugs and playing Mumford and Sons really, really loudly.

After I changed my mind, I decided to take a little time to make sure I really believed what I thought I believed, before telling my friends, family, and, now, all of you.  That left me with the question of what to do about my atheism blog.  My solution was to just not write anything I disagreed with.  Enough of my friends had accused me of writing in a crypto-Catholic style that I figured no one would notice if I were actually crypto-Catholic for a month and a half (i.e. everything from “Upon this ROC…” on) .  That means you already have a bit of a preview of what has and hasn’t changed.  I’m still confused about the Church’s teachings on homosexuality, I still need to do a lot of work to accept gifts graciously, and I still love steam engines.

Starting tomorrow, this blog is moving to the the Patheos Catholic channel (the url and RSS will remain unchanged).  Meanwhile, I’m in RCIA classes at a DC parish, so you can look forward to more Parsing Catholicism tags (and after the discussion of universalism we had last week, I think it will be prudent to add a “Possibly Heretical” category).

This post isn’t the final word on my conversion.  I’m sure there’s a lot more explaining and arguing to do, so be a little charitable in your read of this post and try to give me a little time to expand my ideas over the next few weeks.  (Based on my in-person arguments to date, it seems like most of my atheist friends disagree two or three steps back from my deciding Morality is actually God.  They usually diverge back around the bit where I assert morality, like math, is objective and independent of humans.  As one of my friends said, “Well, I guess if I were a weird quasi-Platonist virtue ethicist, this would probably convince me”).

And how am I doing?  Well, I’m baking now (cracking eggs is pretty much the least gnostic thing I can do, since it’s so, so disgusting to touch, and putting effort into food as more than the ransom my body demands for continued function is the second least gnostic).  I’ve been using the Liturgy of the Hours and St. Patrick’s Breastplate for most of my prayer attempts.  and, over all, I feel a bit like Valentine in this speech from Arcadia.

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14 Responses to An atheist blogger’s journey to Catholicism: Leah Libresco’s story

  1. JabbaPapa says:

    WOW !!

    That’s the first conversion story as crazy as my own experience I’ve ever heard !!

    (shame I can’t really talk about mine in one way, then again a story like this one would automatically be less deeply appreciated otherwise !!!)

  2. Toad says:

    .
    “That’s the first conversion story as crazy as my own experience I’ve ever heard !!
    (shame I can’t really talk about mine in one way, then again a story like this one would automatically be less deeply appreciated otherwise !!!)”

    Well, we’re prepared to bet it’s nowhere near as crazy as yours, dear Jabba – but we cannot wait to hear xacly what happened to you. And we will brook no excuses. It behooves you to tell us immediately. (Was it anything to do with being very tall?) And your sentence in parenthesis is well nigh incomprehensible to Toad. But then, he’s thick.

    If you do not tell all – miss two throws, and return to GO.
    Where Lionel is waiting.

    For what it’s worth, Toad thought Leah’s story was pretty fair, pretentious, verbose, gibberish, from trap to line.
    But then, he would, wouldn’t he?

  3. JabbaPapa says:

    And we will brook no excuses. It behooves you to tell us immediately.

    I hope you enjoy the wait, dear toad.

    (Was it anything to do with being very tall?)

    Only insofar as my very long legs took me along the Camino in the first place …

  4. JabbaPapa says:

    For what it’s worth, Toad thought Leah’s story was pretty fair, pretentious, verbose, gibberish, from trap to line.
    But then, he would, wouldn’t he?

    Toad’s waspishness does, indeed, get the better of him more often than most would be content with.

  5. JabbaPapa says:

    (not that I’m some sort of freakish Harlem Globetrotter either … )

  6. marcy says:

    Reblogged this on My Name is Marcy and commented:
    Mainly figured I’d reblog since my previous post addressed someone with the opposite experience, but also because this is also an awesome post.

  7. Toad says:

    .

    “For several years, a lot of my friends have been telling me I had an inconsistent and unsustainable philosophy. ”A virtue ethicist atheist whose transhumanism seems to be rooted in dualism?”

    Well, Toad can’t answer for “Leah,” but if he had friends who said things like that to him – he’d go and find some nice enemies, to go on vacation with, instead. Can any of us imagine any sentient human being spouting such tripe? Even atheists?

    Saying unkind things about “The Trotters” is dangerously close to hightism, Jabba. Accusing them of “freakism” is practically subversive.

  8. JabbaPapa says:

    ”A virtue ethicist atheist whose transhumanism seems to be rooted in dualism?”
    &
    “Saying unkind things about “The Trotters” is dangerously close to hightism, Jabba. Accusing them of “freakism” is practically subversive?”

    A snowball accusing a coco sorbet of being white ?

  9. Toadsgristle says:

    “A snowball accusing a coco sorbet of being white?”asks Jabba, somewhat obscurely (thinks Toad.)

    More like a snowball accusing a sepulchre.

    Says Toad, being somewhat sepulchral at times, (and even more obscure.)

    Maybe we should stick to pots and kettles.

  10. Toadsgruntle says:

    .
    “This is my last post for the Patheos Atheist Portal”

    Well, the Patheos Atheist Portal had better turn it in, then.
    And take up lepidoptery.

  11. JabbaPapa says:

    Maybe we should stick to pots and kettles

    Bah !!! Party pooper !!!

    And here we all were having some honest decent jolly good old-fashioned tortuous mixed metaphors FUN !!!

    Boo to you, I say !!!

  12. El Toadillo says:

    .
    If it’s mixed metaphors are your forte – try this one from a Telegraph reader recently, “The lemmings have crawled out of the woodwork and are now in the driving seat.”
    Plain as the nose on your pikestaff, really.

  13. By definition of man an atheist is a person who denies or disbelieves in a supreme being.By definition of God an atheist is fool (wicked) person.Congratulation for her believing God the creator and not a miserable wicked creature.

  14. El Toadillo says:

    .
    Couldn’t have put it more succinctly himself, thinks Toad!
    .

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