Some Advent thoughts

The world was in darkness, and nobody knew

The way to the Father, like you and I do.

They needed a light for to show them the way.

And the Great Light came on Christmas day.

The above is a little song that is sung at the beginning of Advent Masses in my parish just before the lighting of the Advent candles, by the children. It is such a simple verse, but I find it immensely powerful. (I am such a softie that my eyes moisten when I hear it!)

As I explain to my own children, Advent allows us to return to the pre-Christian mindset. The meaning of the Incarnation is best appreciated from the position of pagan ignorance. The world was in darkness. Human life was under the control of other more powerful humans, or the fickle forces of nature. Life was ugly, fearful, meaningless and short. The worth of a human being was politically determined: how rich, attractive or useful you were, or who you were related to, decided your lot.

Little man, alone in the vast unfathomable universe, and prey to so much. But then the Jews came along: Abraham, Moses and the Prophets. There is God! He must be worshipped and obeyed. Laws and rituals multiplied. Soon, a power structure and hierarchy arose to control the flow of Holiness. Unholy hypocrisy was born.

However, the Prophets, all countercultural to the core, kept mentioning the coming of the Messiah. And so they waited and waited, (and are still waiting).

And the Great Light came on Christmas day!

About Brother Burrito

A sinner who hopes in God's Mercy, and who cannot stop smiling since realizing that Christ IS the Way , the Truth and the Life. Alleluia!
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6 Responses to Some Advent thoughts

  1. toadspittle says:

    “Human life was under the control of other more powerful humans, or the fickle forces of nature. Life was ugly, fearful, meaningless and short. The worth of a human being was politically determined: how rich, attractive or useful you were, or who you were related to, decided your lot.”

    Very different from today, in fact!

    Like

  2. Brother Burrito says:

    Salvation dates from the time of Christ, by our human reckoning.

    Salvation, in fact, fills all time and space. It was, is, and will be, forever, for It is of God.

    Diachronicity means I can pray for your salvation even after you are dead,

    -and you can return the favour too!

    Like

  3. toadspittle says:

    With Toad’s advanced years, “Diachronicity” is far more likely to work in his favour than in Burro’s. But it’s a nice idea. And Toad savours big words.

    HOWEVER, the serious point here is, for Toad, that Burro’s awful litany above originally happened because Christ wasn’t here, and now it happens despite His being here.

    And if not more than ever, certainly not less.

    What’s up wit ‘at? (As we say in Pittsburgh)

    Like

  4. joyfulpapist says:

    Jesus came. He shed His robe of glory and put on vulnerable flesh. He became one of us, clothed in our skin and bones and blood and sweat and tears. He blessed and restored our humanity by inhabiting it Himself and closed the gap between mortal and immortal. By taking that mortal flesh to the cross to shed His precious and perfect blood, He bridged the impassable chasm between us and our Creator.

    Our God has done the unthinkable, the unimaginable, the impossible, the radical, and the incredible. He came, and He remains. He is with us still.

    This is from a reflection on catholic.org. http://www.catholic.org/clife/advent/story.php?id=39437

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  5. kathleen says:

    Yes Burrito, there are many winsomely appealing hymns and carols that touch our deepest sensitivities as we prepare for the coming of Jesus. Here is a beautiful rendition of my favourite Advent hymn, “Veni, veni Emmanuel”:

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  6. bwr47 says:

    Kathleen

    As you say, a truly beautiful rendition, with some great pictures to accompany it. Thank you for uplifting the start of my day!

    Like

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