St Bonaventure

St Bonaventure

Seven years ago today, on the Feast of St Bonaventure, I buried my mother. She had received  Extreme Unction through the ministry of the Franciscan hospital chaplain a few hours before her death from a dense stroke, four days previously. I had a day’s travel to get to my mother’s bedside, but before I set out, I remembered to ring the hospital in Ireland and ask for her to receive the Sacrament. I arrived just two or three minutes after she had breathed her last, but I am forever grateful that she was ministered to. According to my father, she had been very restless and distressed, but became calm and peaceful at the very moment of anointing, and remained so until she passed away.

The text below is from the Universalis entry for today:

St Bonaventure was born at Bagnoregio in Etruria in about 1218. He became a Franciscan in 1243 and studied philosophy and theology at the University of Paris. He became a famous teacher and philosopher, part of the extraordinary intellectual flowering of the 13th century. He was a friend and colleague of St Thomas Aquinas.

  At this time the friars were still a new and revolutionary force in the Church, and their radical embracing of poverty and rejection of institutional structures raised suspicion and opposition from many quarters. Bonaventure defended the Franciscan Order and, after he was elected general of the order in 1255, he ruled it with wisdom and prudence. He is regarded as the second founder of the Order.

  He declined the archbishopric of York in 1265 but was made cardinal bishop of Albano in 1273, dying a year later in 1274 at the Council of Lyons, at which the Greek and Latin churches were (briefly) reconciled.

  Bonaventure wrote extensively on philosophy and theology, making a permanent mark on intellectual history; but he always insisted that the simple and uneducated could have a clearer knowledge of God than the wise. (my emphasis)

  He was declared a Doctor of the Church in 1588 by Pope Sixtus V.

  See also the articles in the Catholic Encyclopaedia and Wikipedia.

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About Brother Burrito

A sinner who hopes in God's Mercy, and who cannot stop smiling since realizing that Christ IS the Way , the Truth and the Life. Alleluia!
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12 Responses to St Bonaventure

  1. Toadspittle says:

    .
    “…but (Bonadventure) always insisted that the simple and uneducated could have a clearer knowledge of God than the wise. “

    Surely he meant more than the complex and educated? Seems a shame to beat up on the wise. Not their fault.

    Like

  2. kathleen says:

    I am so happy for your mother Burrito, that she received peace with the blessings and grace of the Sacrament of Extreme Unction before she died.
    It was a great consolation to me and my siblings too when our beloved mother received this Sacrament a few days before she died last January. Deo gratias.

    Like

  3. Toadspittle says:

    .

    “At this time the friars were still a new and revolutionary force in the Church, and their radical embracing of poverty and rejection of institutional structures raised suspicion and opposition from many quarters.”

    That was then.

    Nowadays, the “… radical embracing of poverty and rejection of institutional structures …” doesn’t raise an eyebrow.
    Well, why should it?

    Nothing we like better than “rejecting institutional structures”, do we?
    Well, Toad, anyway..

    Like

  4. golden chersonnese says:

    What, Toad, don’t go much for the radical embracing of poverty bit? Hhhmmmm.

    Ross Douthat of the New York Times has been making interesting noises recently (and done a book) about the serious need now for greater “institutionalism” in the Church rather than less. Here ’tis for anyone that’s missed it.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/15/opinion/sunday/douthat-can-liberal-christianity-be-saved.html?_r=2

    http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2012/may/ross-douthat-bad-religion.html

    Like

  5. Toadspittle says:

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    Well Godlen, Toad has been both rich and poor and fromed the opinion that rich is preferable.

    These days he is neither. He just gets by.

    And expects institutionalisation pronto.

    Moreover, he agrees that the radical embracing of wealth, manifested frequently by yhe flaunting of massive lumps of gold, in the form of crosses, rings and chains, and reichly embroidered garments – is, or should be – the subject of anathema – with contumely heaped on the perpetrators.

    Like

  6. Toadspittle says:

    .
    Thanks for the editing function, WordPress. (Make that Wrodperss.)

    “formed,” “the,” “richly,” Doh.

    Like

  7. golden chersonnese says:

    Actually, Toad, very few bishops wear gold pectoral crosses and rings these days. Recognise these chaps?

    http://tinyurl.com/7tacvtb

    Gold is far too heavy and, if the crosses are golden, they are just gold-plated. Gold is one the heaviest of the elements, much heavier even than lead. About 100 bucks could get you one, Toad.

    http://tinyurl.com/86yq7ls

    Anyway:

    http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+2:11&version=NIV

    Like

  8. Toadspittle says:

    .
    Well Godlen, genuine bling is one thing. At least it’s honest.
    To be told that the Princes really only wearing phoney bling really doesn’t help matters much, does it?. (In Toad’s opinion, anyway. Insert smiley face with good tooth.)

    Like

  9. Toadspittle says:

    .
    Freudian slip.
    smiley face with GOLD tooth.
    (Insert sad WordPress face.)

    Like

  10. Toadspittle says:

    .
    “Recognise these chaps?” Godlen asks Toad.

    http://tinyurl.com/7tacvtb

    Unless Toad is mistaken, he does. This lovely “snap” was taken at the now legendary Gay Halloween Fancy Dress Party, where the theme was “religious,” and, unbeknowenst (!!!) to one another, the “guests” all decided on the same outfit!
    That’s why they’re all laughing!

    And, unless Toad’s mistaken again, the very same thing happend the following year when they all came dressed up as nuns! Hard to believe, to be sure – but true!

    Like

  11. golden chersonnese says:

    Oh, Toad, do try to remember that this is a family blog.

    Like

  12. Toadspittle says:

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    Never heard it put like that before, Godlen. Do children really read this stuff?
    Cripes!

    Like

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