Mgr. Pope and St. Patrick. The Post the Archdiocese of New York didn’t want you to read.

 

Time to End the St. Patrick’s Day Parade and the Al Smith Dinner?
By: Msgr. Charles Pope
The time for happy-clappy, lighthearted engagement of our culture may be nearing an end. Sometimes it takes a while to understand that what used to work no longer works. Let me get more specific.Decades ago the “Al Smith Dinner” was a time for Republicans and Democrats to bury the hatchet (even if only temporarily) and come together to raise money for the poor and to emphasize what unites us rather than what divides us. But in the old days the death of 50 million infants was not what divided us. We were divided about lesser things such as how much of the budget should go to defense and how much to social spending. Reasonable men might differ over that.

But now we are being asked to raise toasts and to enjoy a night of frivolity with those who think it is acceptable to abort children by the millions each year, with those who think anal sex is to be celebrated as an expression of love and that LGBTQIA… (I=intersexual, A= Asexual) is actually a form of sanity to which we should tip our hat, and with those who stand four-square against us over religious liberty.

Now the St. Patrick’s Parade is becoming of parade of disorder, chaos, and fake unity. Let’s be honest: St. Patrick’s Day nationally has become a disgraceful display of drunkenness and foolishness in the middle of Lent that more often embarrasses the memory of Patrick than honors it.

In New York City in particular, the “parade” is devolving into a farcical and hateful ridicule of the faith that St. Patrick preached.

It’s time to cancel the St. Patrick’s Day Parade and the Al Smith Dinner and all the other “Catholic” traditions that have been hijacked by the world. Better for Catholics to enter their churches and get down on their knees on St. Patrick’s Day to pray in reparation for the foolishness, and to pray for this confused world to return to its senses. Let’s do adoration and pray the rosary and the Divine Mercy Chaplet unceasingly for this poor old world.

But don’t go to the parade; stay away from the Al Smith Dinner and all that “old school” stuff that hangs on in a darkened world. And as for St Patrick’s Day, it’s time to stop wearin’ the green and instead take up the purple of Lent and mean it. Enough of the celebration of stupidity, frivolity, and drunkenness that St Paddy’s day has become. We need penance now, not foolishness. We don’t need parades and dinner with people who scoff at our teachings, insist we compromise, use us for publicity, and make money off of us. We’re being played for (and are?) fools.

End the St Patrick’s parade. End the Al Smith Dinner and all other such compromised events. Enough now, back to Church! Wear the purple of Lent and if there is going to be a procession, let it be Eucharistic and penitential for the sins of this age.

For the sake of His sorrowful passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world!

How say you?

About Gertrude

Sáncte Míchael Archángele, defénde nos in proélio, cóntra nequítiam et insídias diáboli ésto præsídium.
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38 Responses to Mgr. Pope and St. Patrick. The Post the Archdiocese of New York didn’t want you to read.

  1. toadspittle says:

    “Now the St. Patrick’s Parade is becoming of parade of disorder, chaos, and fake unity. Let’s be honest: St. Patrick’s Day nationally has become a disgraceful display of drunkenness and foolishness in the middle of Lent that more often embarrasses the memory of Patrick than honors it.”
    Could not agree more. Serious drinkers stay home and leave it to the once-a-year-amateurs.
    Green beer. Say no more.

    “…those who think anal sex is to be celebrated as an expression of love…”
    There are some people who would be surprised to hear vaginal sex described as “an expression of love”. …Depends on a lot of other things, I’d suggest.

    Like

  2. Magdalene says:

    I say Msgr. Pope may get reprimanded for speaking and writing too much truth. That is not appreciated in our politically correct neo-Catholic Church of nice.

    Like

  3. mkenny114 says:

    Read a couple of interesting articles today which, whilst not directly relevant to what Mgr. Pope has written above, are certainly relevant in a wider sense, in that they touch on the whole LGBT agenda and the increasing secularisation of self-identified Catholic institutions:

    http://cvcomment.org/2014/09/05/why-gay-people-dont-feel-much-like-exercising-their-right-to-marry/

    http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2014/09/catholic-institutions-identity-abortion-mandates.html

    Like

  4. toadspittle says:

    Four thumbs up already, for Magdalene.
    “I say Msgr. Pope may get reprimanded for speaking and writing too much truth. “N/i>
    Not by Toad, he won’t.
    It’s clearly high time we founded our own politically incorrect Catholic Church of Nasty.
    With Msgr, Pope as pope.

    Like

  5. How say I? I say that Monsignor Pope is absolutely correct, and I want to stand up and cheer when I read what he writes, especially when he writes the kind of things he has written here.

    At the same time, though, I have a deep sense of fear for the Church when I read that the pope is telling us “to put aside decadent structures – they are useless.”

    (http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/the-vatican/detail/articolo/santa-marta-36148/)

    What decadent structures is he talking about? The traditional Mass? The theology of Aquinas? The moral theology that the Church has taught since the very beginning? The belief in the Real Presence? The sacrament of confession?

    And I REALLY feel uneasy when Pope Francis says that Christians must just forget about the “law” and “open their hearts to the new commandment of love.” Love, yes, we all love to the degree that we can. We do our best to love God and one another. The problem, though, is that so many priests and others who have committed acts of child sexual abuse – and other sexual sins – rationalize their behavior by claiming that they too were simply forgetting about the “law” and that they were only following the commandment to “love.”

    I know my fears are probably exaggerated, because even the gates of hell cannot prevail against the Church. I have to remind myself that there have always been times when it looked like the gates of hell were winning.

    Like

  6. toadspittle says:

    Might be wrong, RJB – but perhaps Pope Francis has this sort of sartorial structural decadence in mind?

    http://taylormarshall.com/2013/03/pope-prediction-10-reasons-cardinal.html

    Wonder who Taylor Marshall fancies for the next U.S. president?
    I hope it’s the awful woman from Alaska.

    Like

  7. Tom Fisher says:

    What decadent structures is he talking about? The traditional Mass? The theology of Aquinas? The moral theology that the Church has taught since the very beginning? The belief in the Real Presence? The sacrament of confession?

    As an aside it was The Holy Father’s frequent reminders that it is essential to go to confession that helped win Fr. Z. over.

    Robert John Bennett has resorted to argument by innuendo. He has picked up on the phrase “decadent structures” and, with no basis whatsoever, is attempting to link it in the reader’s mind with denying the real presence, and getting rid of the theology of Thomas Aquinas etc.

    If pushed to actually back up his innuendo he would probably plead ‘rhetorical exaggeration’ etc. etc.

    But nonetheless, let’s be clear, the answer to his question is NO, quite obviously nothing on RJB’s list is what Pope Francis is talking about.

    I’m sick and tired of people deliberately distorting the Pope’s message — and I include when they did it to Benedict too.

    Shameful

    Like

  8. kathleen says:

    Tom, I do honestly think your loyalty to the Holy Father is admirable. But I also think RJB (Robert) makes a very valid point in his concern with the HF’s watering down of the “Divine law” by emphasising the need to open our hearts “to the ‘new‘ (?) commandment of love”.

    Love: such a fundamental, beautiful and holy virtue, and so misused in its meaning today!
    It is not “love” to allow someone to continue in a lifestyle of grave sin without correction, without warning them that the breaking of God’s Divine Law could lead them to Hell.
    It is not “love” to brush over fundamental Catholic Doctrinal Teachings so as not to “offend” non-Catholics who do not hold to them.
    It is not “love” to abandon the ‘sheep’ of your own ‘flock’ to hob nob with the ‘goats’ outside.
    (I could go on but, well, perhaps I better not…..)

    Besides, the Holy Father has not suddenly discovered something new. “Love” – true Love in the Person and Words of Our Lord Jesus Christ – is the very cornerstone on which the Church was built. It has ALWAYS, at all times and in all places, from the very foundation of the Church, been the indelible mark of a true Christian.

    P.S. And I pray for our Holy Father Pope Francis ever day – as I’m sure every other Catholic does. He needs our prayers very urgently in these difficult times for the Church.

    Like

  9. johnhenrycn says:

    TF, I don’t think RJB was dissing the pope, but his (the pope’s) extemporaneous pronouncements often give comfort to the enemy – that is, those who wish to hollow out the Church, or worse – even though that’s not his intention. Still, I will always give him the benefit of the doubt, until he actually says something clearly contrary to settled doctrine.

    When I have more time, I would like to give his first (and only) encyclical The Light of Faith a close reading. It might answer some of our questions regarding the direction he wishes us to take.

    Like

  10. toadspittle says:

    Here we are, all cosily giving Pope Francis the “benefit of the doubt” – much as if he were a suspect in a downtown drug bust.
    Quite right, too.
    “Still, I will always give (Pope Francis) the benefit of the doubt, until he actually says something clearly contrary to settled doctrine.”*
    So, if the utterly horrible and unthinkable, actually happens – and Francis says the contrary stuff – what will you, or I – or any of us, do then, JH?
    Refer to naughty old Anglicans, which means the Blessed, non-Catholic, Knight in Shining and Dogmatic Protestant amour – C.S. Lewis?
    …Or should we just get on with it, as best we can?

    (*What is “settled doctrine,”, anyway?
    No argument? No problems? No point in thinking about it?) …
    OK. Whatever.

    Like

  11. johnhenrycn says:

    I give him the benefit of the doubt because he’s the pope, not because he’s suspect. Clear?

    If he were to utter something utterly horrible, I will oppose said utterances. Clear?

    Settled doctrine is not the same as fossilized doctrine. Clear?

    Like

  12. toadspittle says:

    Kathleen gives us several examples of what “love’ isn’t – but very wisely- no idea of what it actually is.
    Very wise on her part, because, “Love” – like any other metaphysical concept – like “Good,” or
    ” Sin,” or “True,” or indeed, “God,” itself – means exactly whatever each one of us thinks it ought to mean – no more, no less.
    How could it possibly be otherwise?

    Like

  13. johnhenrycn says:

    “LGBTQIA…(I=intersexual, A= Asexual)”

    Thanks for the translation, Kathleen. I’m still struggling trying with QWERTY.

    But speaking of the fair(ie) sex, here’s a sad piece about the Galway, Ireland chapter of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul:
    http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2014/09/catholic-leaves-estate-to-fund-catholic.html

    À propos the Toad’s query about what to do “if the utterly horrible and unthinkable, actually happens”, my answer, in the case of the Irish SVP, would be to find another Irish Catholic charity to support, toot sweet.

    Like

  14. johnhenrycn says:

    “I’m still struggling trying with QWERTY”

    See what I mean?

    Like

  15. toadspittle says:

    ”Settled doctrine is not the same as fossilized doctrine. Clear?”
    …Not to me, JH.
    But you will make it clear to me, in a twinkling, that’s for sure.
    Until a few moments ago, I’d never even heard of “fossilized” doctrine.
    Sounds interesting.
    Never really understood how several-billion year old fossils fit in with immortality and Original Sin.
    But I’m always ready to learn.

    Like

  16. johnhenrycn says:

    “Never really understood how several-billion year old fossils fit in with immortality and Original Sin. But I’m always ready to learn.”

    Roger will be along in a moment to explain.

    As for “fossilized” doctrines, I will defer to the Pope:

    “The Holy Father emphasized that, ‘from the earliest days of the Church, there has been a temptation to understand doctrine in an ideological sense or to reduce it to a set of abstract and fossilized theories. In fact, doctrine has the sole purpose of serving the life of the People of God and seeks to ensure a firm foundation to our faith. Great indeed is the temptation to commandeer the gifts of salvation that come from God, to acclimate them—maybe even with the best intention—to the world’s viewpoints and spirit.’
    http://www.news.va/en/news/pope-receives-congregation-for-the-doctrine-of-the

    Like

  17. kathleen says:

    Well Toad, you old thicko, I don’t think it would take a lot of effort to simply switch my examples of what Love is not, to see what Love is… That for starters anyway.

    For example: to try to lovingly warn someone and coax them away from a “lifestyle of grave sin” to save their immortal souls from Hell would be showing them “love”.
    To impart fundamental “Catholic Doctrine” whenever or wherever one finds oneself (with kindness and due tactfulness of course) would be another way to show “love’ to others.
    To fulfill one’s obligation to teach and educate those in your charge to love God and all the Teachings of the One Church He founded, would be to “love” them.

    Naturally there are many ways of showing love, but I absolutely disagree with you that love (or any of the other things you mention @ 19:04) “means exactly whatever each one of us thinks it ought to mean“.

    Has no one ever told you that “Relativism” is a heresy Toad?
    During his papacy Pope Benedict XVI wrote: “A dictatorship of relativism is being formed, one that recognises nothing as definitive and that has as its measure only the self and its desires.”
    A description that fits you like a glove! 😉

    Like

  18. kathleen says:

    JH @ 19:13

    It is Gertrude’s article (written by Msgr. Pope) not mine, so your thanks should go to her… or the Monsignor! 😉

    And don’t ask me what all those weird sexual groups mean – I haven’t a clue myself! ❓

    About your link on the SVP… yes, some Irish friends had already alerted me to this disgrace! The saintly and faithful Catholic founder, St. Vincent de Paul, would be horrified to see what these traitors are doing to his order.

    Like

  19. johnhenrycn says:

    Kathleen:
    “It is Gertrude’s article (written by Msgr. Pope) not mine, so your thanks should go to her or the Monsignor!”

    Yes. Realized that just as I clicked “Post Comment” 😦

    Like

  20. toadspittle says:

    “Naturally there are many ways of showing love, but I absolutely disagree with you that love (or any of the other things you mention @ 19:04) “means exactly whatever each one of us thinks it ought to mean“.”
    Put it this way, Kathleen. You don’t know what I mean by “love,” do you? Or all this would be easy and pointless.
    You don’t know what JH means by love – you can only know what he tells you, and that won’t do. Words are “fuzzy.”
    It is clearly impossible to put concepts like “love,” “good,” or “bad,” into adequate words, and even if you try, you can never be sure the other person is grasping what you are trying to get at. How can anyone describe beheading someone else, as “Good” or “Just,” or “Necessary”?
    …But people do.
    I don’t know what you mean by “love,” – can’t, and never will.
    I’d have thought all this was obvious.
    Anyway, it is relative, whether you like it or not. It is measured in degrees, not necessarily specified. Because do you love God more – or less – than you love your husband – or your cat, or Marmite, or in a different way? But I love being called a ‘thicko.’
    For the “love” of God, don’t stop.

    Like

  21. Gertrude says:

    Regarding the article – it is Mgr. Pope’s alone. I just reposted it, and am pleased to see the ongoing discussion. Since the removal of the article on the Archdiocesan website, Mgr. Pope has the following to say:
    What happened to the St. Patrick’s Parade Post?
    By: Msgr. Charles Pope

    Many of you have expressed concern about a blog post I wrote on the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, which was removed. I am grateful for your concern about this and all the issues we discuss here. I removed the post upon further reflection due to the strong nature of the language I had used in parts of it. I apologize if the language I used caused offense.

    I remain concerned about the central point of the article, namely, how we as Catholics can effectively engage a culture that increasingly requires us to affirm what we cannot reasonably affirm. There are many prudential decisions involved in the answer to this question, and my intent is not to directly criticize any bishop or diocese. But this is an issue we must all collectively wrestle with as our culture and our faith reach deeper differences.

    I am grateful to the Archdiocese of Washington, which has generously sponsored our conversation on this site for five years. I am also grateful to all of you who read and comment. I ask mutual charity and understanding for all parties involved. The beautiful motto of James Cardinal Hickey, who ordained me, rings just now in my heart: Veritatem in Caritate (the truth in charity).

    It is the shame of our Church that Catholic bloggers who speak against heterodoxy, whether in the U.S. or the United (for the moment) Kingdom are being silenced, whilst our Bishops seem to pronounce against or contrary to Church teaching with impunity.
    Kathleen is absolutely right that we should be praying for the Holy Father and for the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church to which we belong from the moment of our Baptism.

    Like

  22. johnhenrycn says:

    Heck, I was born on St Patrick’s Day and have never been to a parade on March 17 or ever drank green beer, so Msgr Pope can consider me firmly in his camp.

    Like

  23. toadspittle says:

    JH – a man of taste and common sense.
    I can’t find any “strong language” in Msgr. Pope’s piece. He’s right, though. St Pat’s day is a moron’s bunfight.

    Like

  24. johnhenrycn says:

    Now, here’s a question that a typophile might be able to answer for me. Should Charles Pope be referred to as Msgr. Pope or Msgr Pope? Note the HUGE difference (ha!). Should we type St. Peter or St Peter? In the U.S.A., where they love periods, I think the full stop is always used in titles, but Fowler calls them a plague (full stops, that is, not Americans), except in cases where the last letter of the abbreviated title is not the last letter of the full title. Hence, Capt. Cook, but Sgt York. Perhaps Toad can remember what the Toledo Blade stylebook says in response to Fowler?

    Like

  25. johnhenrycn says:

    Toad, your last YouTube is totally off topic. Is it a video of a St Paddy’s day Parade? The singer sounds a lot like one of my favourite artists:

    Like

  26. johnhenrycn says:

    Hey, Toad: That last YouTube upload of mine was not the the best version of Randy Newman’s paean to the vertically challenged, but this is. You and I are lucky that CP&S allow us to fool around 🙂

    Like

  27. johnhenrycn says:

    Brother Burrito:

    When you go in for your shift tonight, after you put your patient to sleep, try guessing what is the one word in the English language that includes “xyz” in that order.

    Like

  28. johnhenrycn says:

    ..and what do these words have in common:
    baobab, dachshund, yieldability, hopscotch, youngberry and dumbfounded ???

    Like

  29. toadspittle says:

    “.and what do these words have in common:
    baobab, dachshund, yieldability, hopscotch, youngberry and dumbfounded ???”

    …These are the names of JH’s children. His wife is named “Xyzene” – lovely name, possibly Bosnian, JH?
    And. yes CP&S is very tolerant.
    …And Rabit will have a fit. Probably go carnivorous.

    Like

  30. toadspittle says:

    …Belated apologies to JH – the above are, of course. the names of some of his male children.
    The girls – well, some of them, anyway – are called, “Xyzenia,” “Xyzema,” “Xyznophobia, ” and “Xyznocracia,” in deference to their mother.

    Like

  31. GC says:

    JH, I’m sure the answer is that a baobab tree was once used as a prison in Western Australia and all the others were not?

    Prison Boab Tree Derby WA

    If you want strange-looking plants you could do worse than to holiday on the Yemeni island of Socotra, which was once the see of a monophysite bishop.

    http://www.amusingplanet.com/2012/05/socotra-island-of-strange-plants.html

    (Frere Rabit may find the pictures stimulating in his geography classes.)

    Like

  32. toadspittle says:

    Trees

    I THINK that I shall never see
    A poem lovely as a tree.
    A tree whose hungry mouth is prest*
    Against the sweet earth’s flowing breast;
    A tree that looks at God all day, 5
    And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
    A tree that may in summer wear
    A nest of robins in her hair;
    Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
    Who intimately lives with rain.
    Poems are made by fools like me,
    But only God can make a tree.

    …World’s soppiest pome?
    But what a tree!
    I want one.
    My dogs could live in it.

    * “Prest?” Whaa…?

    Like

  33. GC says:

    Dearest Toad, you didn’t tell us who writtied* it, viz. Joyce Kilmer, who was, by the way, a bloke, poet, philosopher, lexicographer, and literary reviewer and who died at age 31 in the Second Battle of the Marne. Did I mention his whole family were Catholic converts and contemporaries of Chesterbelloc?

    * © Rabit.

    Like

  34. GC says:

    The Sycophantic Fox and the Gullible Raven

    Dear Toad, and while we haven’r been chastised as yet, some verse from another struggulent poetic contemporary of Chesterbelloc and Joyce Klimer

    The Sycophantic Fox and the Gullible Raven
    By Guy Wetmore Carryl

    A RAVEN sat upon a tree,
    And not a word he spoke, for
    His beak contained a piece of Brie,
    Or, maybe, it was Roquefort:
    We’ll make it any kind you please—
    At all events, it was a cheese.

    Beneath the tree’s umbrageous limb
    A hungry fox sat smiling;
    He saw the raven watching him,
    And spoke in words beguiling:
    “J’ admire,” said he, “ton beau plumage,”
    (The which was simply persiflage).

    Two things there are, no doubt you know,
    To which a fox is used,—
    A rooster that is bound to crow,
    A crow that ’s bound to roost,
    And whichsoever he espies
    He tells the most unblushing lies.

    “Sweet fowl,” he said, “I understand
    You’re more than merely natty:
    I hear you sing to beat the band
    And Adelina Patti.
    Pray render with your liquid tongue
    A bit from ‘Götterdämmerung.’”

    This subtle speech was aimed to please
    The crow, and it succeeded:
    He thought no bird in all the trees
    Could sing as well as he did.
    In flattery completely doused,
    He gave the “Jewel Song” from “Faust.”

    But gravitation’s law, of course,
    As Isaac Newton showed it,
    Exerted on the cheese its force,
    And elsewhere soon bestowed it.
    In fact, there is no need to tell
    What happened when to earth it fell.

    I blush to add that when the bird
    Took in the situation
    He said one brief, emphatic word,
    Unfit for publication.
    The fox was greatly startled, but
    He only sighed and answered “Tut!”

    THE MORAL is: A fox is bound
    To be a shameless sinner.
    And also: When the cheese comes round
    You know it ’s after dinner.
    But (what is only known to few)
    The fox is after dinner, too.

    Like

  35. GC says:

    No relation to our Raven, of course. Guy Wetmore Carryl also died at age 31 a short while after helping to put a house fire out.

    Like

  36. johnhenrycn says:

    GC:
    baobab, dachshund, yieldability, hopscotch, youngberry and dumbfounded all begin and end with the same letter. It seemed amusing at 21:23 hrs last night when no one else was around. Now? Not so much.

    Like

  37. GC says:

    That was on the tip of my tongue, JH. Well, I was “tepid” if not quite “warm”.

    Actually, I am prosaic enough to suggest that they are all “compound words”, i.e. words made up of two other words stuck together. Even dachsund, “mole dog” (no, not sausage dog).Wasn’t sure whether baobab fitted, though.

    If Toad still wants one for the garden, he should come with spade, wheelbarrow (a very large one) and hat with lots of winebottle corks hanging off it to the Swan River Colony (aka Western Australia these days), to the Kimberley region, and just take his “pick”. He can not only shove his dogs into it, but also eat it, drink it, wear it and be medicated (though I think it has no hydroxyzine – by George, I think I’ve got it).

    http://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/boab_tree.html

    An added incentive for our amphibious friend:

    http://www.boabtreewines.com.au/index.php?route=product/product&path=59&product_id=56

    Like

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