Life is changed, not taken away

02bg-pg5-standalone_280496fAll Souls Eve in Mangalore, in the state of Karnataka, south India

Since yesterday, 2 November 2014, was a Sunday, it is today, 3 November, that the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed falls in the 1962 Roman Missal of St John XXIII. This is from the Preface in the Missal for today:

We should at all times and in all places give thanks to You, holy Lord, Father almighty, eternal God, through Christ our Lord:

in Whom the hope of a blessed resurrection has beamed upon us: so that those who are saddened by the certainty of dying may be consoled by the promise of a future deathless life.

For to Your faithful people, Lord, life is changed, not taken away; and when the home of this earthly sojourn is dissolved, an eternal dwelling is made ready in heaven.

Edgar Bainton (1880-1956) was the son of a Congregationalist minister and born in Hackney. He studied composition at the Royal College of Music and after academic appointments in the United Kingdom moved in 1934 to the Conservatorium of Music in Sydney, Australia, to become its director.

He set the words of Revelation 21, vv. 1-4 to music for organ and choir and it’s quite a favourite for choirs, for reasons that should soon become clear. The preface above does seem quite beholden to these verses from the Apocalypse.

And I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea.

And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.

And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying: Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and He will dwell with them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself shall be with them, and be their God.

And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain; for the former things are passed away.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. Amen.

About GC

Poor sinner.
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4 Responses to Life is changed, not taken away

  1. mkenny114 says:

    Lovely stuff🙂

  2. johnhenrycn says:

    Coincidentally with this post about life being changed, not taken away (for the faithful anyway), there appeared a shocking report in our local newspaper today saying that more Canadians die each year by killing themselves than die by car accidents, HIV, homicide, drowning, flu and war combined. It would be interesting to know something about the religious committment of those who kill themselves. I’d be willing to bet there’s an inverse relationship between devout religious belief and suicide.

  3. kathleen says:

    Since yesterday, 2 November 2014, was a Sunday, it is today, 3 November, that the Commemoration of the Souls of the Faithful Departed falls in the 1962 Roman Missal of St John XXIII.”

    I discovered this yesterday when I attended my monthly Traditional Latin Mass in the “usus antiquior”; it was not the Mass for the Holy Souls, but the Mass for the twenty-first Sunday after Pentecost. According to the priest celebrant, the reason for this transferring of the Commemoration Mass of the Souls of the Faithful Departed to Monday is because on Sundays one does not celebrate funeral Masses, Sunday being the day we celebrate the Resurrection of the Lord. Vox Cantoris also has an interesting post on this same topic.

    Nevertheless he gave a wonderful sermon on Purgatory – one of the best sermons I’ve heard for a long time. It was also a very reverent and beautiful Mass.
    He was a priest from the SSPX.

  4. Tom Fisher says:

    I’d be willing to bet there’s an inverse relationship between devout religious belief and suicide

    I don’t feel certain enough to bet either way. My brother was a Catholic but his depression was a powerful force. Human minds are hard to fathom. I suspect (and may be wrong) that religious belief doesn’t correlate with suicide as much as we might expect.

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