Who Am I to Judge?

By RONALD MANN on ‘Crisis Magazine

Detail from “Christ Expels Money Changers Out of Temple” painted by Cecco del Caravaggio in 1610.

Detail from “Christ Expels Money Changers Out of Temple” painted by Cecco del Caravaggio in 1610.

I am sick and tired of this “who am I to judge?” silliness. Only God can judge the state of the human soul. But it is pure humbug to suggest we cannot and should not judge human behavior. Reluctance to judge moral behavior is the inevitable consequence of moral relativism and moral subjectivism that has eroded confidence in the ability to determine objective moral truth on which sound judgment is based.

Judgment is an essential component of the exercise of authority. If you do not have the courage to judge, then you should avoid positions of authority. Not being judgmental is a curse of our age. When I cautioned my teenagers not to hang out with so and so, the standard response was “Oh, Dad, you are so judgmental!” Not to judge is a dereliction of duty that afflicts so much of the Church’s hierarchy. It obscures our Lord’s message, sows confusion among the faithful, and undermines lay efforts to fight against the perversions of the day.

Absence of judgment or inept judgment in regard to the pederasty scandal elevated the deviant behavior of a relatively small number of miscreant priests into an international scandal that subjected the papacy to scorn and crippled the Church for several decades. A recent example of the “who am I to judge?” question involved homosexuality and was uttered by Cardinal Dolan in a very public venue.

Cardinal Dolan said the Bible tells us not to judge people. In response to a question on Meet the Press last year about the announcement that football player Michael Sam was a homosexual, Cardinal Dolan replied: “I would have no sense of judgment on him. God bless ya. I don’t think, look, the same Bible that tells us, that teaches us well about the virtues of chastity and the virtue of fidelity and marriage also tells us not to judge people. So I would say ‘bravo’.”

So, the Bible tells us not to judge people? Consider: “thus says the Lord: you, son of man, I have appointed watchman for the house of Israel; when you hear me say anything, you shall warn them for me if I tell the wicked, ‘oh, wicked one, you shall surely die,’ and you do not speak out to dissuade the wicked one from his way, he shall die for his guilt, but I will hold you responsible for his death. But if you warn the wicked, trying to turn him from his way, and he refuses to turn from his way, he shall die for his guilt, but you shall save yourself (Ezekiel 33: 7 – 9).

Neither Peter nor Paul were squeamish about judging others:

Peter said to Simon the magician “Your heart is not upright before God. Repent of this wickedness of yours … for I see that you are filled with bitter gall, and you are in the bonds of iniquity” (Acts 8: 20 – 23).

Paul said to Elymas, “you son of the devil, you enemy of all that is right, full of every sort of deceit and fraud. Will you not stop twisting the straight paths of the Lord?” (Acts 13: 9 – 10).

Here are some excerpts from the epistles that illustrate judgment:

“[W]hen Cephas came to Antioch, I opposed him to his face, because he clearly was wrong” (Gal 2:11).

“[B]rothers, even if a person is caught in some transgression, you who are spiritual should correct that one in a gentle spirit…” (Gal 6:1).

“[T]ake no part in the fruitless works of darkness; rather expose them…” (Gal 5: 11).

“[R]eprimand publicly those [presbyters] who do sin, so that the rest will also be afraid” (Tim 5:20).

“[T]herefore, admonish them sharply, so that they may be sound in the faith…” (Titus 1:13 – 14).

“[E]xhort and correct with all authority…” (Titus 2:15).

“I am convinced about you, my brothers, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, and able to admonish one another” (Rom 15:14).

“[I]t is widely reported that there is immorality among you… A man living with his father’s wife.… The one who did this deed should be expelled from your midst. I … have already, as if present, pronounced judgment on the one who committed this deed, in the name of our Lord Jesus…. You are to deliver this man to Satan for the distraction of his flesh, so that his spirit may be saved on the day of the Lord” (1 Cor 5:1 – 5).

So it is clear that the Bible often encourages judgment of the behavior of others. But those who disdain judgment often cite (Mt 7:1 – 2): “Stop judging that you may not be judged. For as you judge, so will you be judged…..” This is not an injunction against judgment, but a warning that the judgment should be rendered with a good heart free from hypocrisy, arrogance, meanness of spirit, or hate. Thus “remove the beam from your own eye first; then you will see clearly to remove the splinter from your brother’s eye” (Mt 7:5). The principal purpose of a judgment is to help my brother and others avoid debilitating actions and improve. The awesome burden of judging is the realization that we will be “judged as we have judged.” Some cite the incident of the woman caught in adultery and brought to Jesus by those who would stone her as evidence that we should not judge others. Nothing could be further from the truth. The incident manifests God’s mercy and loathing of hypocrisy, but he did judge her behavior as evidenced by his admonition: Go and sin no more.

We honor those men and women throughout the ages, who have had the courage to judge the sinful behavior of others and publicly testify against it. Despite the cost, Sir Thomas More admonished King Henry VIII not to be acclaimed as the supreme head of the Church of England since that would deny papal authority, and he also warned the king that it would be bigamous for him to marry Anne Boleyn. Did not John the Baptist judge when he publicly accused Herod of adultery because he took Herodias for his wife despite her still being married to Herod’s brother Philip? Juries judge defendants all the time.

The quality of a judgment usually depends on the information available to the judge and the impartiality of that judge. A judgment may be positive, negative, or neutral. Once a judgment has been rendered, the question becomes what should we do when asked about it? There are several options. We could say nothing or “no comment” and let the matter drop. We could say nothing publicly and rebuke, admonish, or praise in private. We could announce our judgment in an appropriate forum. Finally, we could use the public forum that posed the question to instruct viewers on precisely what the Catholic position on the subject is and emphasize that we love the sinner but hate the sin.

It is love that sometimes prompts us to speak out when the stakes are high. “Do not be deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor boy prostitutes nor sodomites … will inherit the kingdom of God” (1 Cor 6: 9 – 10). Cardinal Dolan squandered an opportunity to instruct not only the sinner, but also the confused and ignorant about what the beautiful teaching of the Catholic Church is. How could Cardinal Dolan add “bravo” to the end of his response? This poor homosexual must choose either a lifetime of celibate self-denial or risk eternal damnation for indulging in sexual sin.

Most priests, bishops, cardinals, and popes are good men dedicated to the service of God. But they are subject to error, bias, and vanity like everyone else. Sycophancy is an ever present danger. The Peter Principle that states that people tend to be promoted one level beyond their level of competence clearly applies at times to members of the Church hierarchy. Over recent years, we have seen sound judgment too often impaired by cowardice that masquerades as prudence and by capitulation to the zeitgeist that camouflages itself as pastoral concern.

In the modern world, instant widespread communication in many different kinds of media exposes mercilessly the shortcomings that may occur in public conversations and events. Loquacious people like Cardinal Dolan are especially vulnerable. Transparency and candor are welcome characteristics, but the Church hierarchy must learn to control the narrative.

So let us pray that God will give us the courage to make sound judgments and the wisdom to use those judgments for the benefit of his children. Judges would do well to remember Paul’s advice to Timothy: “Avoid foolish and ignorant debates, for you know that they breed quarrels. A slave of the Lord should not quarrel, but should be gentle with everyone, able to teach, tolerant, correcting opponents with kindness. It may be that God will grant them repentance that leads to knowledge of the truth, and that they may return to their senses out of the devil’s snare, where they are entrapped by him, for his will” (2 Tim 2: 23 – 26).

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38 Responses to Who Am I to Judge?

  1. ginnyfree says:

    Some forget this simple bit of wisdom: one of the spiritual works of mercy is to admonish the sinner. Doing this in gentleness and love is NEVER wrong. God bless. Ginnyfree.

  2. geoffkiernan says:

    The Holy Fathers words, ‘Who am I to Judge’ will I fear, come back to haunt him.

    Putting all ‘wisdom and hindsight’ aside I sensed there was something wrong with this pronouncement however conceded that coming from our new Holy Father it must be true. It never sat well with me, but in my enthusiasm for the Pope I sort of accepted it reluctantly in some vague sense…virtually every Catholic I know, swallowed it with gusto
    The foolishness of the remark is there for all to see (for those who have eyes to see) The Catholic media (some) and secular media all, jumped on the band wagon sensing a ‘change’ or a slackening of the churches rigidity in Her doctrine. We accepted it without a whimper.

    We can only wonder at the damage caused by such an ill conceived comment from the Holy Father.
    I am reminded of a report about two American Catholic Senators who actually changed their minds in respect to same sex marriage ….and there vote, to affirmative.
    More than ever before we must pray for the Holy Father and the Church

  3. toadspittle says:

    “Do not be deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor boy prostitutes nor sodomites … will inherit the kingdom of God” (1 Cor 6: 9 – 10).”
    …How about girl prostitutes? Bit of sexism here.
    But who are we to judge?

    “…one of the spiritual works of mercy is to admonish the sinner.”
    …After we’ve got through with admonishing ourselves, of course.
    Which will be never, if we are honest.

  4. toadspittle says:

    “We can only wonder at the damage caused by such an ill conceived comment from the Holy Father.”

    ..But you are not “…only wondering” are you Geoff? You are (metaphorically) holding your head in your hands, and keening, and rocking back and forth, and making noises only bats can hear, aren’t you?
    Consider: What’s the point of being Pope, if you can’t annoy anybody?

  5. Roger says:

    Peter whatsoever you bind etc …

  6. kathleen says:

    My goodness Toad – you do talk an awful lot of rubbish!🙄
    _____

    To Pope Francis’ question, “Who am I to judge?”, one is inclined to want to reply: “Well Holy Father, you are the Pope, aren’t you? That’s what Popes do: judge, guard and protect the Deposit of Faith, guide the faithful, exhort, teach…”

    This great article gets to the root of much that is wrong in the ‘politically correct’ crowd of ‘nice’ of far too many in the Church today. They fear men’s condemnations if they were to speak out clearly about grave sins, like sodomy, abortion, adultery, etc., and the danger to people’s souls who willfully indulge in mortal sin, but show little concern for God’s judgement on themselves one day for not doing so!
    For did not Our Blessed Lord also say: “He therefore that shall break one of these least commandments, and shall so teach men, shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven. But he that shall do and teach, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.”

    And the same goes for all of us, the laity, too of course. If we do not teach the truth to our children… or if we, for want of a quiet life, fail to admonish (tactfully and with kindness) family members or friends who are indulging in sinful lifestyles… or to speak up for God’s Divine Law (if the occasion arises) when this is being dragged through the mud – then we too will be judged “the least in the kingdom of Heaven”!

    I don’t know about everyone else, but this article and it’s tough but clear message that we should stand up for what is right and godly, and denounce sin (judge) always, certainly pricks my conscience.

  7. I’m surprised no one here knows that the Pope said, “[a] person who is seeking God, who is of good will — well, who am I to judge him?”

    Now someone of good will seeking God would not wish to offend him by giving in to sinful inclinations, making themselves liable to judgement.

  8. I might add from the same interview,
    “They are called to fulfill God’s will in their lives and to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord’s cross the difficulties they may encounter… that while certain acts may be wrong, we would always love and respect the person and treat the person with dignity. We want to make people understand that according to human nature it is a man and a woman who are made for each other and made to give humanity a future.

  9. johnhenrycn says:

    Toadsputum at 19:47 – What ‘bible’ are you reading that refers to “boy prostitutes”? Sounds like a cartoon version thereof that you picked up at the Toledo, Ohio branch of the Church of Latter Day Dudes – along with your second wife. There are also some poor Catholic versions. I can think of one. Or two.

    Holy Roman Manoeuvre at 23:50 – It sounds to me like you and Pope Francis are indulging in a wee bit of tergiversation, if that’s the mot juste, but I do agree with him that we shouldn’t judge anyone (in a moral, as opposed to a legal, sense); we should criticize wrong behaviour. There’s a difference, and I don’t think it’s tergiversatory. Insofar as carnal behaviour is concerned, to criticize ‘unchasity’ pretty well says it all without us chaste (or semi-chaste) people having to get too up close and personal. I prefer to let my interlocutors decide what I mean by unchastity. The much appreciated (by me and others) commenter, Ginnyfree, says it’s okay to admonish sinners, and I do agree, but how we admonish is every bit as important as the act itself. As she says: doing so with “gentleness and love is never wrong”; but let’s not confuse “gentleness and love” with condescension, noblesse oblige and holier-than-thou. Sometimes, setting a good example is the best form of admonishment, especially when dealing with adults who are not closely related to us, and who therefore have reason to wonder whether our gentle words of “love” are actually coming out of the mouth of Little Goody Two-Shoes.
    ___
    Oh, I had such a good Confession today, and rewarded myself with a nice lunch at an old (1929) restaurant around the corner where our Cardinal Archbish also likes to go. One of the waiters was wearing a shirt with a humorous caption on the back:

    One True Religion Service Company Inc.
    Billions served since 33 A.D.

    I asked him if he really is Catholic, and his answer was the right one. No false advertising in other words😉

  10. toadspittle says:

    “Toadsputum at 19:47 – What ‘bible’ are you reading that refers to “boy prostitutes”? “
    Dunno, JH, Just took it out of context, as usual – my life’s work, y’know.

    REVELATION OF THE YEAR: (so far.)
    “My goodness Toad – you do talk an awful lot of rubbish!”
    Toad must gently chide Kathleen – with the reminder that that’s is his metier.

    “it is a man and a woman who are made for each other and made to give humanity a future.“</i.
    I'm not altogether convinced that humanity deserves a future. But Francis knows best.

  11. toadspittle says:

    “He therefore that shall break one of these least commandments, and shall so teach men, shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven. But he that shall do and teach, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.”
    That seems to imply we are all in the kingdom of heaven.

  12. johnhenrycn says:

    Toadacidreflux at 05:35: Your “life’s work” is unknown to me (I’ve never read The Toledo Blade, nor its sister publication, The Bullfrog Miner, but do try not to make cheap points like “boy prostitutes” being mentioned in any serious versions of the Holy Bible. M’kay?

  13. Tom Fisher says:

    @JH re 1 Corinthians 6:9-10

    Toad was quoting the New American Bible

    The NRSV (New Revised Standard) has Do you not know that wrongdoers will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived! Fornicators, idolaters, adulterers, male prostitutes, sodomites

    Douay has Nor the effeminate, nor liers with mankind, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor railers, nor extortioners, shall possess the kingdom of God

  14. JabbaPapa says:

    I’m surprised no one here knows that the Pope said, “[a] person who is seeking God, who is of good will — well, who am I to judge him?”

    I am routinely ignored when I point this out to people.

    Those who wish to either hate or champion whichever false Pope Francis they’ve built in their minds are not much interested in listening to what the Pope has actually said.

  15. JabbaPapa says:

    “Toadsputum at 19:47 – What ‘bible’ are you reading that refers to “boy prostitutes”? “
    Dunno, JH, Just took it out of context, as usual – my life’s work, y’know.

    You’re not taking anything “out of context” Toad, you’re quoting from a mendacious translation that has “boy prostitutes” instead of “adulterers”.

    … and it’s hardly the first time is it, that you’ve uncritically postred these false claims about the contents of Scripture ?

    What sort of websites do you lift them from ? Why don’t you just do the work to verify your sources ?

    Or did you imagine that these or those feminist or pro-gay or self-designated “humanist” or anti-Catholic or Protestant or self-designated “sceptic” websites that you seem to always turn to might be authored by irreproachable and unfailingly honest Bible scholars with no agenda of their own ?

  16. johnhenrycn says:

    Friend Tom Fisher: the New American Bible is one of the Catholic ones at which I look askance. The copyright is owned by the USCCB, which is why it is one of the best selling Catholic Bibles in the USA; but my reading of orthodox Catholic commentary is that it is infelicitous. I remember smiling smugly (but inwardly) once in 2006, the year after I was confirmed (10 years ago as of 26 March this year), when a fellow Bible study member (RIP) read a passage from it. Another Catholic version I think to be unfortunate is the Jerusalem Bible.

    So the NAB is where Toadmucous found the phrase “boy prostitutes” is it? The New American Bible, heh, heh. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, as they say in Toledo, Ohio. Not even Bozoboy’s Last Hope Calvary Chapel in California has a holy book with that silliness in it.
    ___
    As for your reference to other versions:

    “Male prostitutes [and] sodomites” are not the same as “boy” prostitutes.

    “Effeminate” is not the same as “boy” prostitute.

    “Liers with mankind” are not the same as “boy” prostitutes.

    Indeed, I suggest to you that there is no such thing as a boy prostitute.

  17. Tom Fisher says:

    @Jabba

    you said to Toad:

    What sort of websites do you lift them from ? Why don’t you just do the work to verify your sources ?
    Or did you imagine that these or those feminist or pro-gay or self-designated “humanist” or anti-Catholic or Protestant or self-designated “sceptic” websites that you seem to always turn to might be authored by irreproachable and unfailingly honest Bible scholars with no agenda of their own ?

    Well. The reason the the NAB is published on the Vatican website is that it is a perfectly respectable translation.

    http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0839/__PZB.HTM

    You are far too aggressive in the way you address people

  18. Tom Fisher says:

    @JohnHenry

    Quite right, although as I said to Jabba it is a respectable translation. It has in this case chosen to restrict the term (by tendentiously translating it to mean ‘boy prostitiute’) in such a way that the meaning is distorted

  19. johnhenrycn says:

    Well said at 08:13, Jabba.

    …Oh dear…

  20. Tom Fisher says:

    Another Catholic version I think to be unfortunate is the Jerusalem Bible.

    Absolutely! Even just from a literary perspective it’s flat and lifeless

  21. JabbaPapa says:

    You are far too aggressive in the way you address people

    howsabout you stop sticking your nose where it does not belong, namely into my relationship with Toad. You’ve met neither of us, and it’s not up to you to police how we talk to each other.

  22. Tom Fisher says:

    You talk the same way to other people as well. Johnhenry, not Toad, is the most frequent target of your purple prose.

  23. johnhenrycn says:

    Tom Fisher: at 08:31 you call the NAB a “perfectly respectable translation”; but then at 08:35 you say it “tendentiously” translates the phrase in question as “boy prostitute[s]”.

    What synonym for the word “tendentious” best fits the sense in which you are using it:

    prejudiced, bigoted, chauvinist one-sided, partial or partisan ?

  24. Tom Fisher says:

    Fair enough JH! Well it’s a very low point in a not altogether terrible translation. I completely agree that it’s a poor choice of term, and made with a clear political agenda

  25. JabbaPapa says:

    Johnhenry, not Toad, is the most frequent target of your purple prose.

    Tom Fisher caressed the surface of his keyboard with his long, thin fingers as he perused the objectionably ornate and pretentiously over-Catholic verbiage that marred the pristine cool smart hardness of his bright computer monitor, recently purchased online at a price that Fisher knew to be well below the true value of the component’s usefulness for the purpose of his stern personal admonishments against that sort of horridly detailed writing, and its disturbing of his otherwise peaceful Sunday tranquillity. Fisher’s siamese cat Melmoth brushed its tail languorously against the silken pyjama legs as he slowly but deliberately commenced typing his rebuke, short worded, he thought smugly, and directly to the point that he wished to make against that bloated, infuriating pompous blowhard of the man who had so frequently injured his online tranquillity with his unwanted paragraphs of detail and lengthy words of dictionary origin and of not believing the simple things of Fisher’s own modernist/gnostic/neo-pagan political credences and persuasions. “Hah!”, he exclaimed to himself triumphantly as he put the finishing touch to his message, “That will teach the blighter!”. His concerned green eyes darted from one serifed letter to another, drinking in each word’s meaning as purposefully as he drank in his morning coffee.

  26. johnhenrycn says:

    TF at 08:57 – Especially from a literary perspective. The JB version of Psalm 121:1-4…

    “I lift my eyes to the mountains :
    where is help to come from?
    Help comes to me from Yahweh,
    who made heaven and earth.
    No letting our footsteps slip!
    This guard of yours, he does not doze!
    The guardian of Israel
    does not doze or sleep.”

    This whole translation is ridiculous, but the word I’ve highlighted makes me sneer. I remember the United Church (Methodist) minister who presided at the memorial service for my brother after his ski accident reading Psalm 121 from the KJV. Thanks be to God.

  27. toadspittle says:

    “Or did you (Toad) imagine that these or those feminist or pro-gay or self-designated “humanist” or anti-Catholic or Protestant or self-designated “sceptic” websites that you seem to always turn to might be authored by irreproachable and unfailingly honest Bible scholars with no agenda of their own?”

    No, Jabba.
    Or should that be,
    Yes, Jabba….?
    ….Oh, you decide.
    I’m pretty sure it’s one or the other.

  28. Tom Fisher says:

    Melmoth (the wanderer?), not a bad name for a cat, I have to admit.

    This guard of yours, he does not doze!

    It’s hard not to laugh while reading that JH, just awful

  29. johnhenrycn says:

    Hey! Jabba at 09:41: Have you read Melmoth, The Wanderer? If you have, ‘splain to me why the monks mentioned live in a convent, not a monastery. This not a trick question. I couldn’t understand why Maturin used the word convent in that context. Also, I wonder if Patrick O’Brian had Charles Maturin in mind when he wrote his beloved novels about Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin.

    As for the entirety of your 09:41 comment, I shall Google it later to see if there is something *similar* to it on the WWW.

  30. toadspittle says:

    Dear Mr. Jabba,
    We are in receipt of a sample of your “purple prose,” as of 9.41, March 1st., 2015
    Unfortunately …at this time…specialised tastes…although not without merit…etc., etc.
    Yours sincerely,
    Toadspule, Dawkins and Fry,
    Publishers,
    Grub Street,
    Moratinos.

  31. Tom Fisher says:

    Johnhenry:

    Note Jabba’s final sentence:

    His concerned green eyes darted from one serifed letter to another, drinking in each word’s meaning as purposefully as he drank in his morning coffee

    Not bad right?

    Here’s a link:

    https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10402318/1/Trollkit-s-Legacy

    It’s cribbed from a passage illustrating ‘purple prose’.

    Ah well. All good fun

  32. Tom Fisher says:

    Another (better?) example is

    He wrapped a long, thin finger around the sturdy handle of the shiny black receptacle. Slowly, he hoisted the ceramic vessel to his pale pink lips. The steaming liquid rolled acridly around his sensitive tongue, evoking an involuntary reaction to the South American beverage’s bitter taste. The liquid was a stark black, reflecting the pale glow from the screen of his rectangular computer monitor. His concerned green eyes darted from one serifed letter to another, drinking in each words meaning as purposefully as he drank in his coffee.

  33. geoffkiernan says:

    At the risk of returning to the point of this report, let me say that what ever the Holy Father’ intent with his many utterances the end result is confusion. This should suggest that he exercise some discretion. And what of his minders? do they need to ‘ lift their game’ and what does it say about their intent?

  34. johnhenrycn says:

    So Jabba (in fun, of course) cribbed (in fun, of course) his 09:41 comment (in fun, of course)?

    “He’s dead, Tom Jim.”

    …is another famous *quote* making the rounds right now, because it was spoken by some guy named Spock. Can you guess which one? Hint: Not Dr Spock

  35. toadspittle says:

    .Fie..shame on us! ..Are we so bereft of originality we have to steal even our “purple prose”?
    Aren’t we brainless enough to think up our own? Toad certainly is!

    ” ‘splain to me why the monks mentioned live in a convent, not a monastery. “
    Same reason you would, JH – because convents are much more fun for monks than monasteries.
    …Bleeding obvious, surely?

    (I think you’re just teasing us, you naughty old possum.)

  36. JabbaPapa says:

    Hey! Jabba at 09:41: Have you read Melmoth, The Wanderer? If you have, ‘splain to me why the monks mentioned live in a convent, not a monastery. This not a trick question. I couldn’t understand why Maturin used the word convent in that context.

    Maturin used a very gallic style — and in French, the residence of Monks can be described as a “couvent” (convent) — as also, I believe, Italian and Spanish.

    I’m not entirely sure — but I think that on the continent a modest building housing a small group of Friars would be called a convent ; whereas the word “monastery” would be reserved for some more extensive establishment comprising both land and several buildings for the community.

  37. JabbaPapa says:

    It’s cribbed from a passage illustrating ‘purple prose’.

    Only partially cribbed ‘cos I was in a hurry ; but well done for seeing that.

    Don’t worry — I’ve no need to crib any purple from anyone else, and I’m sure I’ll be liable sometimes to paint both your cat and my responses to you as purple as purple can be …

  38. JabbaPapa says:

    Another (better?) example is

    Oh don’t worry — I really am the wrong person to challenge about writing style.

    To be continued …

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