Father Nicholas Gruner RIP

Many will have heard by now the sad news of the sudden death two days ago of the faithful Fatima Apsotle, Fr Nicholas Gruner (May 4, 1942 – April 29, 2015).

From the Fatima Network

In_Loving_Memory.png The Management Team of the Fatima Center sadly announces the death of Father Nicholas Gruner, who passed away suddenly this evening. Father died at his office, working to his last breath on the goals to which he dedicated his 38 years in the priesthood — the promotion of the Message of Fatima, especially the release of the full Third Secret and the Consecration of Russia to Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart.

Details concerning the visitation and funeral for Father will be announced in the upcoming days. For now, in your charity, please pray for Father and for his Apostolate, which will continue to seek to bring his life’s work to a successful conclusion.

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17 Responses to Father Nicholas Gruner RIP

  1. toadspittle says:

    The ludicrousness of the stature in the picture is quite remarkable. I shall say no more.

  2. geoffkiernan says:

    To The Toad: …” I shall say no more”……….Wanna bet???

  3. Tom Fisher says:

    Father died at his office, working to his last breath on the goals to which he dedicated his 38 years in the priesthood

    We could do worse than pray for such a death, it sounds like a good way to meet the end

  4. toadspittle says:

    No more regarding the statue, Geoff.
    I agree, Tom. I’d like to drop dead walking the dogs. Worth a prayer on that account.

  5. geoffkiernan says:

    Toad, never thought for a moment you meant to say, ‘all further comment… ever’. But having said that, I must ask you what it was you found so ludicrous about the Statue.?? going by the number of down votes, some others are probably wondering also.

  6. geoffkiernan says:

    How to ‘Shut the Toad Up’

  7. kathleen says:

    “I’d like to drop dead walking the dogs. Worth a prayer on that account.”

    No – absolutely not! Toad, unless one is in a perfect state of grace, like this holy priest Fr. Gruner certainly appears to have been, a sudden and unprepared death is the greatest of misfortunes!
    To be taken in a flash from this world to the next with unrepentant mortal sins on one’s conscience could take one straight to Hell. I say “could” because we do not know if there are a few moments after physical death – thanks to the many prayers of faithful souls for those dying unprepared – and before the soul leaves the body, when the Divine Mercy will give a soul time to repent and choose God over Evil; for this reason the Church does not pronounce on who is in Hell. (But I wouldn’t bank on this! Risky.😉 )

    All the saints and mystics in the history of the Church have warned of what a disaster an unprepared death truly is for us sinners. St. John Bosco (and other saints) prepared monthly exercises to avert the dangers of death arriving suddenly. One of the promises made to those who pray the daily rosary is that they will not die without time for contrition for their sins. Catholics also pray to St. Joseph for a “happy death”, which means a death where we may have time to prepare our souls to enter Eternity.

    Remember the words of Our Blessed Lord on this topic?
    “And I will say to my soul: Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years take thy rest; eat, drink, make good cheer. But God said to him: Thou fool, this night do they require thy soul of thee: and whose shall those things be which thou hast provided?” (Luke 12:19-20)

  8. toadspittle says:

    “…unless one is in a perfect state of grace…(…)…a sudden and unprepared death is the greatest of misfortunes!”

    All a bit of a metaphysical crap shoot, in fact – eh, Kathleen?
    Very likely.
    A moral lapse for a second after a lifetime of hitherto unblemished virtue, then under the bus wheels and straight into the fires of Hell for all eternity. Don’t seem fair, somehow – does it?
    …Must be, though.

  9. toadspittle says:

    Geoff, I’ve only just read your question at 2.45. Lazy Toad.
    Because the statue would merely look insipid, sentimental, soppy, and in a word, “wet” – without that tin thing perched precariously on top of it.
    …That moves it into the ludicrous zone. (But that’s just my opinion, of course.)
    And there are only 9 “thumbs down” (so far) any way. I’d prefer 999.

  10. toadspittle says:

    To elaborate a bit:

    Carrión de los Condes (Palencia). Iglesia de Santa María del Camino o de las Victorias. Virgen de Santa María del Camino

    What’s gone so horribly wrong with Catholic art over 700 years? And why?

  11. GC says:

    I don’t think a lot of it was even intended as “great art”, but as “aids” to a particular religious devotion for fairly ordinary folk. You can’t criticise an orange for not being an apple.

  12. Tom Fisher says:

    What’s gone so horribly wrong with Catholic art over 700 years? And why?

    GC pretty much nails it @ 04:14. And you can rest assured that 700 years ago there were lots of devotional statuettes etc. that wouldn’t strike you as “great art” — but most of them haven’t been preserved.

  13. Tom Fisher says:

    St. John Bosco (and other saints)

    ‘Ain’t Bosco a blogger?

  14. toadspittle says:

    True enough, GC. And who’s to say definitively what’s “good,” and what’s not, anyway? It’s all matter of taste and preference. Some people like Picasso, some like Poussin. (Some like neither.) Some like Catholicism, some like Calvinism.
    I prefer the Virgin Del Camino, from Carrion De Los Condes, to the Father Gruner statue.
    Others may not. Tolerance is the watchword, here. Toad must try harder. Any fule can tolerate things he or she finds agreeable.

  15. geoffkiernan says:

    What’s gone so horribly wrong with Catholic Art over 700 years I don’t think is the point in this instance… The statue is simply an attempt to portray the unportrayable. Should we be appraising it as a work of art when we all know in this day and age ‘time’ is not a plentiful commodity which is necessary to compose a genuine work of art. I don’t think so. That is also apart from the need for a genuine artist capable of creating it.
    As I said, simply an attempt to portray the unportrayable. To call it ludicrous is a bit…well…ludicrous

  16. Tom Fisher says:

    an attempt to portray the unportrayable. To call it ludicrous is a bit…well…ludicrous

    +10 Geoff

  17. toadspittle says:

    “Should we be appraising it as a work of art when we all know in this day and age ‘time’ is not a plentiful commodity which is necessary to compose a genuine work of art.”

    …But someone found sufficient time to make the Fatima statue sentimental, trite, and mawkish. Or, maybe it isn’t – except in my eyes.
    I suspect when most people look at it – the idea of “art” never enters their heads. So, yes, let’s flood the place with versions of it. I believe there was a small version of it in my house when I was a Toadpole. Along with something like this:
    https://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=AwrBT9UFTUpVRgsAP5BXNyoA;_ylc=X1MDMjc2NjY3OQRfcgMyBGZyA3lmcC10LTMwNC1zBGdwcmlkA0E5OWZzYktrVHBlb3lSVHZMU3JmeEEEbl9yc2x0AzAEbl9zdWdnAzQEb3JpZ2luA3NlYXJjaC55YWhvby5jb20EcG9zAzAEcHFzdHIDBHBxc3RybAMEcXN0cmwDMjYEcXVlcnkDSmVzdXMgc2FjcmVkIGhlYXJ0IGltYWdlcyAEdF9zdG1wAzE0MzA5MzI3ODg-?p=Jesus+sacred+heart+images+&fr2=sb-top-search&fr=yfp-t-304-s&fp=1

    (And a photo of Pius Xll, of course.)

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