Kenyan Bishop on international indifference after massacre of 150 Christian students

It is not only very sad, it is also very shameful, that Bishop Anthony Muheria of Kitui (Kenya) should have to announce the cold indifference shown by the international community to the callous massacre of so many young Christian students at the hands of islamic jihadists in his country last Easter. 

From Rome Reports on 17/5/15

When Pope Francis met with Bishops from Kenya, one of the main issues they talked about was the recent massacre of 150 Christian students in the University of Garissa. It’s an attack that was carried out by Muslim extremists. On Holy Thursday, Christian students were separated for Muslims and were then shot.

Visibly shaken, Bishop Anthony Muheria says he was disappointed by the international reaction, which didn’t pay much attention to the tragedy.

MSGR. ANTHONY MUHERIA
Bishop of Kitui (Kenya)
“They only address something if they are directly affected. If the victims had been exchange students from the United States, I think the international reaction would have been a lot different.”

That’s why the international community, he says, needs to take action to stop Islamic extremism. The problem he says, is no longer isolated. Rather, it’s a global challenge.

MSGR. ANTHONY MUHERIA
Bishop of Kitui (Kenya)
“This is what we have to highlight time and time again. If the victim is American, Italian, Kenyan, African, Indian, Asian. Whether the person is educated or not, Muslim, poor or rich- a life is a life and 150 people are too many.”

Since the tragedy struck, the Church is providing moral and spiritual support for the victim’s families.

MSGR. ANTHONY MUHERIA
Bishop of Kitui (Kenya)
“As a Church we’re trying to help people. First comes forgiveness, especially in this Year of Mercy. They can’t leave any room for hatred or revenge in their hearts. It’s not easy because it’s only human for them to feel a sense of pain and bitterness.”

Even though Christians were clearly targeted in the attack, the Church has a strong presence in Kenya. About one third of the population is Catholic, which breaks down to about 7 million people. The country also has more than 5,000 seminarians.

MSGR. ANTHONY MUHERIA
Bishop of Kitui (Kenya)
“We need a moment of grace. A moment where we can feel the active presence of the Holy Spirit. That testimony cannot come to life without the help of the Holy Spirit.”

During the Pope’s Urbi et Orbi blessing on Easter the Pope prayed for the 150 Christians students who were killed because of their faith.

The Pope has consistently denounced the persecution of Christians and the complicit silence that often comes with it.

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4 Responses to Kenyan Bishop on international indifference after massacre of 150 Christian students

  1. toadspittle says:

    “They only address something if they are directly affected. If the victims had been exchange students from the United States, I think the international reaction would have been a lot different.”

    No argument there.
    We’ve all seen the headlines that read “Two Americans (or Britons) among 450 dead in Java plane crash.” Only human, really. Little Timmy’s toothache is a greater disaster in his family than 10,000 Iranians dying in a earthquake 3,000 miles away.

    However – all of this slaughter is, I suggest, considerably more significant and worthy of our semi-hysterical attention than proposed minor adjustments to the lifestyles of a few gay MIcks.

  2. mkenny114 says:

    Why can’t we pay attention to both?

  3. toadspittle says:

    Nothing whatever to stop us.
    Just a question of prioritizing, as our American Brethren love to verbalize.
    …And then, there’s always the altar rails, and communion on the tongue to add piquancy.

  4. mkenny114 says:

    Yes, but I don’t think discussing the one means neglecting the other. I think the reason SSM may get more ‘air time’ is simply because it is more controversial – when considering massacres, there is pretty much unanimity re the fact that this is a terrible thing; when considering the upcoming referendum in Ireland, some (ahem) have lots of questions to ask🙂 and so this generates more discussion. Doesn’t mean it is getting priority over other issues.

    Another way of looking at this is via the analogy of warfare – a general or wartime politician must devote most of his attention to the front on which the fighting is being conducted, and would be foolish to neglect it; but if he ignored movements amongst his own fellow countrymen that would seek to weaken their side from within, he would be equally foolish. Again, in this case, the latter would be the more contentious issue, and would probably generate the most discussion.

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