Overpopulation Is A Myth

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8 Responses to Overpopulation Is A Myth

  1. toadspittle says:

    This video is not inaccurate – it’s just beside the point.
    By all means, have masses of children, particularly if you are A Starving Human Being In Sub-Saharan Africa. Several dozen of your kids will die of hunger and/or disease, virtually at birth, but you can then content yourself by watching this video on your Ipod, which will assure you that you are taking the decent, moral, course. And you can justify your sumptuously numerous family by telling yourself, “It’s not The Myth of Overpopulation that’s killing so many of my children. It’s just poverty, greed, and politics. So that’s fine.
    …Think about it.

    “Many societies are facing a real danger – extinction.”
    Why should “extinction” be a danger, real, or otherwise? To whom? If Toad became extinct, who would care? Not him. He’d be extinct. If humans became extinct, the planet would be vastly improved – nicer, kinder, more sane. Nobody can dispute that, surely?
    I suppose extinction was a real danger to Dodos. So what? No more Dodos. Species are constantly becoming extinct. Life goes on.

    ….Until it doesn’t, I suppose. I hadn’t really thought about it.

  2. Michael says:

    If humans became extinct, the planet would be vastly improved – nicer, kinder, more sane. Nobody can dispute that, surely?

    Yes, I think quite a lot of people would dispute that. Apart from anything else, the terms ‘nice’, ‘kind’ and ‘sane’ would be virtually meaningless in a world without self-conscious, reflective, reasoning creatures.

    I suppose extinction was a real danger to Dodos. So what? No more Dodos. Species are constantly becoming extinct. Life goes on.

    Ah I see, we’re no different from Dodos. And all this time I thought humans differed from the rest of the animal kingdom on a number of key points. But now I see. Question is, now I’ve realised this, as well as the fact that life is utterly meaningless…well, what’s the point in going on with it? C’mon Toad, you must see how this line of argument (and way of thinking in general) undermines itself completely?

  3. Michael says:

    P.S. Furthermore, I think this uber-pessimistic attitude is actually quite offensive to the people in Sub-Saharan Africa who strive so hard to live their lives and make a way for themselves in the world. To write off life as meaningless in such a trite fashion when so many receive it with such gratitude and work so hard to maintain themselves in it is really quite distasteful (IMO).

  4. toadspittle says:

    Of course we’re different from Dodos. We’re not extinct for one thing. And we are, I’m told, made in the image of God, whereas Dodos presumably were not.
    When did I ever say life is meaningless? Life means whatever we want it to mean, no more no less.
    What’s the point in going on with it?
    To see what happens next.

  5. Michael says:

    When did I ever say life is meaningless?

    Ha! Apart from a whole litany of comments in the past, I’d say your original comment gives that impression fairly strongly.

    Life means whatever we want it to mean, no more no less.

    No it doesn’t. Life either has a meaning, or it doesn’t – we don’t get to just create it for ourselves.

    What’s the point in going on with it?
    To see what happens next.

    This just seems like having one’s cake and eating it. If life is as dreary and moribund as you suggest, and it makes no difference whether species continue to exist or drop into extinction, then what could we possibly expect next other than more dreary decline. And again, if this is the case, why bother? Unless deep down you don’t really believe life is as futile as you make out of course. Maybe next time you’re considering how indifferent the universe is or how meaningless life is (sorry, I forgot, we each ‘create’ the meaning of everything off our own backs…), you might want to consider how this would sound if you said it to someone in Sub-Saharan Africa (or anywhere else where people don’t enjoy the comforts that allow us to drift into world-weary scepticism) struggling to survive against all odds precisely because they value their existence so highly.

  6. kathleen says:

    If humans became extinct, the planet would be vastly improved – nicer, kinder, more sane.

    Said by a true non-believer who compares people’s sinful behaviour with that of his dogs, and therefore opines that people fall far behind!

    Well, if we all only looked at human sin in all its ugliness and nothing else, we might well concur… but what about the immense good throughout the ages that Man has brought to the world? Are you really so blinkered and ignorant of Man’s unique dignity, beauty and creativeness when he strives to follow in the Image and Likeness of God?
    Man is the only Being capable of “knowing and loving” His Creator, immortal, free to choose between Good and Evil, and thus set far above all other living creatures.
    “What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?
    For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour”
    (Psalm 8).
    God has communicated with Man, giving him ‘lights’ about His own Divine Nature; He has pathed out a plan for us so that we too can find true happiness with Him forever in Heaven. God has visited His people to save them from their sins and road to eternal death. He loves us (unworthy as we are of so great a love) and has gone to unimaginable lengths to prove His love and save us from Hell.

    And you say God was wrong?!!!

  7. toadspittle says:

    Where do you get these ideas, Michael? My life is spectacularly undreary – so much so that I have to occasionally take time out to be dreary alone for a day or so in Salamanca or someplace – to get my blood pressure back down.
    “This just seems like having one’s cake and eating it.” Yes, I enjoy doing that. Double cake. Fattening, though.
    “Life either has a meaning, or it doesn’t – we don’t get to just create it for ourselves.”
    If you like, but you’d have to give me some evidence to justify that. Unless, we agree the “meaning of life” is. having been born, to reproduce, then die. Which might be said of everything in God’s creation. Does a tree have a meaning? Does an ant? If it does, does it know it does? impossible to say, I’d say.

  8. Michael says:

    Where do you get these ideas, Michael? My life is spectacularly undreary – so much so that I have to occasionally take time out to be dreary alone for a day or so in Salamanca or someplace – to get my blood pressure back down.

    Yes I’m sure your life is most enjoyable, and feels very meaningful as well no doubt. What I don’t understand is how you reconcile this experience with your view of existence in general.

    If you like, but you’d have to give me some evidence to justify that.

    To someone who seems to be sceptical of almost all evidence (bar what can be measured in a lab or produced by a calculator) , I’m not sure that there is anything I could put forward that you would accept. The shortcomings of positivism, and its tendency to undercut its own principles, are plain enough, but you seem very committed to it.

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