The Need for Catholic Manhood in a World of Disruption and Disorder

By Maike Hickson and published on ‘OnePeterFive

John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara in The Quiet Man (1952)

John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara in The Quiet Man (1952)

After the first terrorist attack in Paris in January of 2014, I began working on this essay. Following the most recent attacks, I decided it was time to finish it and see it published. Two important articles have raised important questions about the state of the West in its unavoidable confrontation with the increasing expansiveness of Islam. After the attacks of felonious homicide in Paris, France on January 7th, two authors, Professor Roberto de Mattei[1] from Italy, and Emeritus Professor William Kilpatrick[2] from the United States, have both warned the West to understand the resolute will of Islam, despite their varied means, to attain one main objective: to take over Western culture and civilization, and not only in Europe. Both show that the West in its vacillating and relativist ideology of multi-culturalism and liberalism is not prepared to defend its own countries against a growing Muslim influence and implantation. In the face of the recent attacks again in Paris, it is worthwhile considering these two authors once more.

De Mattei wisely says that many methods of the modern Muslim combatants have been influenced by revolutionary methods of Terror that derive originally from the secular Enlightenment as well as from Communism-Leninism (and the subtler forms of Gramscianism) all of which have implemented their anti-Christian worldview in Europe with the indispensable help of terror, perhaps first practiced systematically in France itself in 1793. Thus, de Mattei shows how the Christian West is encircled or permeated by two antagonistic powers—Secular and Islamic—which are both anti-Christian and also disposed to employ inhuman methods to spread their worldview, especially those hypocritical Secularists who openly support the systemic large-scale terror of “abortion” (the deliberate killing of pre-born children). The answer of the Italian historian, de Mattei, to this grave, even mortal, challenge, is: Christ Crucified. Only by clinging to Him and to His truth in full will the West be able to recover its strength and find the will to defend itself, or the vulnerable women and little children. As he shows, a weakened and softened West without strong convictions and principles will lack the necessary strength to oppose such declared and resolute opponents.

The interrelated theses of these two authors have further inspired me as a German, moreover, to think, as a convert, even more practically about the Catholic Faith as the only adequate resistance and remedy for our situation.

The Catholic Church has long been largely under attack from Liberals, especially since the visceralities of the 1960s, when feminism gave rise to criticism of the “patriarchical structures” of the Church. The society, and especially the women, purportedly had to be disencumbered from such suppression and submission. In the wake of this ongoing cultural revolution, women strove more and more to be like men, to seek their types of institutional functions, to emulate the men and take their positions and jobs, and even to look more and more like them in dress and gesture. The women toughened up—and are now even entering Army Ranger School—and the men increasingly conceded and receded and were further weakened, in part, by the spreading suspicion that the men enduringly have had an underlying “will to subjugate the women.” And from early childhood on boys, often taught largely by women, were thwarted, if not nearly suffocated, in their natural desire to be protectors and providers and to be manifoldly strong.

My husband – who himself is a West Point graduate and Special Forces officer – memorably reported to me how a fine young Catholic Marine recruit from Baltimore was sent home from his basic training in the mid-1980s, because he would not surrender his rifle to a woman inspecting-officer. The male officers privately appreciated his choice, but dared not make their views public—and thus they asked him to relent, because he was even then considered to be such an excellent prospect as a full Marine and was already at the very top of his class at his well-known Parris Island, South Carolina basic training. When the young man then very soon came to visit my husband at his home in Front Royal, Virginia to tell him, with much embarrassment, the whole story, my husband warmly honored him and embraced him, especially after the young man said the following words: “Sir, there comes a time when a man should no longer have to take orders from a woman—and certainly not to have her inspect his rifle.” That was so in the 1980s, but we have gone much further now in what my husband calls “the forward march of regress.”

My husband and I have already observed in our own little boy of five years of age, how much he desires to be a protector and provider. He blossoms when he can “cut trees down,” “clear the yard,” “rescue people,” “shoot the invader,” or just show how strong he is, wrestling and boxing with his dad and asking to be thrown high aloft. All these ideas and desires of our little son derive nothing from television or video games, for he has none of these and has no access to them, but only to books and an occasional film. We have abstained from exposing him to examples that directly or indirectly present such sensation and violence and worse, to include the spreading scenes of unmistakable inhumanity. Our little son’s recurrent desire to protect, to do the difficult chores, to be strong is somehow implanted, and I believe it is God-given. That is what he is made for: to found a family, for example, and to protect and provide for that family: indeed a beautiful and challenging adventure itself. God made men strong so that they can do hard jobs and can make a living to feed a whole family. What an honor. What a grace. God made men also strong so that they can protect their families against intruders and aggressors, which is an enlivening form of just defense. Such was part of the chivalrous ethos which forthrightly said, or implied: “the more defenseless someone is, the more that person calls out for your defense.” It is according to this ethos that, in an emergency situation when a ship is sinking, women and children are always first put into the rescue boats. Men need to be honored for that. But, my husband sometimes asks with agony and from his heart: “Where are the men now when we are drowning in the blood of our children and are even sending women to do our fighting for us?”

That these same virtuous and chivalrous qualities are needed now again—and more and more so in our degenerating societies and the deeper culture—should be a conviction growing continually clearer to any reflective person—even to one who is but briefly and desultorily exposed to the happenings of war and diminishing peace in our world today. For instance, I remember seeing recently with my husband a short film about the citizenry in that contested strategic part of Ukraine (and historic Russia) called the Crimea and how the men in the towns of these contested areas on the verge of civil war took prompt precautions and concrete actions for the protection of their families—and they took them in their own hands without waiting for any government approval, much less supervision. They set up check points and made sure no one with weapons would enter their town. (I do not intend to enter into the discussion about the merits of the Russian-Ukrainian historical and cultural and strategical claims in this exacerbating conflict in the Ukraine; I only take this manly and vividly remembered sincere response of family fathers as a supporting example). When I saw the serene and unpretentious and abidingly responsible conduct of these men, I said to my husband: “Which men would act like this in the U.S., or even in Old Europe, any more? Sincerity, cheerfulness, no strutting or swaggering, and yet a just and persevering determination to do the right thing for the right reason—always to protect the little ones. ”

One cannot expect men to protect us women if we have feminized them for decades and have gotten them accustomed to being halted in their attempt to guide and to lead. If you take away their leadership—and their sense of responsibility and of accountability—in society and in families, they will not later be leaders in a larger conflict in society, or in a challenge coming from without.

That is where the full truth of the Catholic Church should be re-introduced into the discourse and manners and our practical and unblushingly virtuous conduct. While honoring and cherishing women throughout the centuries and giving them prominent as well as humble places where, in their different “states of life,” they became admired and cherished saints, spiritual doctors of the Church, prioresses, foundresses of religious orders, authors, solitary contemplatives and quietly suffering souls—but especially mothers and nourishers of family love—the Church herself as an intrinsically hierarchical communion is led by men. God has become man in Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ founded His Church with twelve men, while holy women had their own important and indispensable part in the Passion and Salvation History. (We think now especially of St. Mary Magdalene!) While the Church was led by a Pope, as the Vicar of Christ, the families were analogously led by men as the heads of families. St. Paul even more explicitly presents the analogy between Church and Family in the following pericope, when he says in Ephesians 5:

Let women be subject to their husbands, as to the Lord: Because the husband is the head of the wife, as Christ is the head of the church. He is the savior of his body. Therefore as the church is subject to Christ, so also let the wives be to their husbands in all things. Husbands, love your wives, as Christ also loved the church, and delivered himself up for it.” (Eph. 5: 22-25, Douay-Rheims translation).

In both cases, the men who lead are called to a special form of self-sacrifice. The men, traditionally, are the ones who volunteer first and die first in a war. Christ loved us first and died first for us. In this teaching and fostered expectation, the Church strengthens manhood and the leadership of man, and unto the greater good of the families and of the society and the authoritative State. Since God has created us, He knows best how we should live on earth unto the benefit of larger mankind and, most of all, unto eternal life and the salvation of souls: i.e., the supernatural Common Good, not just the natural-temporal Common Good.

Therefore—and here I hope with my husband and with our children to follow in the steep and good footsteps of Roberto de Mattei himself (indeed a “Bonum Arduum” in the words of Saint Thomas)—the world should (and must) rediscover the fuller truth of the Person of Christ and His more abundant life and teaching: Christ Crucified and Christ the King. We would, thereby, not only create happier families and a happier society, but ultimately we would also know, with the indispensable help and virtues of Catholic Manhood, how better then to defend ourselves against all enemies coming from without and from within the Church, knowing that we were made for Beatitude and may thus trust in the Divine Grace to assist our completion there—with the hope that not one of our little children would be finally lost.

***

[1] Roberto de Mattei, “Christ Crucified: Scandal to the Muslims, Foolishness to the Secularists,” Corrispondenza Romana, January 14, 2015, as translated by Rorate Caeli: http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2015/01/christ-crucified-scandal-to-muslims.html

[2] William Kilpatrick, “Will a Future Pope Be Forced to Flee Rome?,” The Catholic World Report, 21 January 2015: http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Item/3645/will_a_future_pope_be_forced_to_flee_rome.aspx

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41 Responses to The Need for Catholic Manhood in a World of Disruption and Disorder

  1. M P P says:

    Amen to all of this!

  2. toad says:

    My beloved CP&S has gone quite mad.

  3. johnhenrycn says:

    No need to spend time on Toad the Twit’s contribution to this thread. His “beloved CP&S”?

    This moving and finely written essay brings to mind a book of essays I bought 15 years ago:

    “At a time when all of America is debating the wayward course of contemporary manhood comes this rich and eye-opening anthology of 3,000 years of the most profound and inspiring writing on the subject of manliness. A source of guidance and inspiration, this wisdom-filled collection also reflects on the confusions of modern manhood by addressing contemporary issues…”

  4. Tom Fisher says:

    I don’t know much about Canada, but somewhere in the environs of ‘Preston’ there’s a darn fine personal library.

  5. Tom Fisher says:

    My beloved CP&S has gone quite mad.

    I had a beloved aunt who went quite mad. It did her a world of good. She was completely barking for twenty years. It opened her mind to spiritual things, she used to laugh at cats and wonder about the purpose of seagulls. Much to admire there, if not emulate.

  6. johnhenrycn says:

    “…a darn fine personal library…”
    Extremely kind of you to say so, TF, and quite true too, which is in no way boasting on my part, since I have simply made it one of my goals in life to pass on the printed (not merely digitized) words of the ages to the fruit of my loins – and if not to them, to a Catholic monastery, seminary or college. Fahrenheit 451, what? Here’s a passage from the What Is A Man? book I mention above adumbrating the woeful influence “Rock and Roll” has had on our children. It was written by Bishop Jacopo Sadoleto (later Cardinal Sadoleto) to Pope Leo X some 400 years before Elvis Presley and John Lennon sprung from their mothers’ loins:

    “What correctness or beauty can the music which is now in vogue possess? It has scarcely any real and stable foundation in word or thought…It obscures and hampers the sense and meaning by abruptly cutting and jerking the sounds – as though music were designed not to soothe and control the spirit, but merely to afford a base pleasure to the ears, mimicking the cries of birds and beasts, which we should be sorry to resemble…For when flaccid, feeble, sensual ideas are rendered in music, in kindred modulation of the voice, weakly yielding to lust, languishing in grief, or rushing in frenzied agitation…what ruin to virtue, what wreckage of character, do you suppose must ensue?”

    De pueris recte ac liberaliter instituendis (1538)


    Abschied🙂

  7. toad says:

    “base music…..mimicking the cries of birds and beasts, “

  8. toad says:

    Unsurprising to see there were blue-nosed loonies 500 years ago, like Catd. Sadoleto,”The rubbish people listen to these days, When I was a lad. blah., blah.” Now we have JH. Progress!
    I suppose when monks first started singing some old bishop whined, “Why do we need singing? Our Blessed Lord didn’t sing. We never had no singing when I was a lad.”

  9. Tom Fisher says:

    I have simply made it one of my goals in life to pass on the printed (not merely digitized) words of the ages to the fruit of my loins – and if not to them, to a Catholic monastery, seminary or college.

    Yes — absolutely. In this respect we are kindred souls. In the top left hand corner of the bookshelf in my study you would find the dog-eared and dusty books I have kept since earliest childhood; Alice (of course), The Wind in the Willows, and Pooh. The shelves wrap around the four walls (with appropriate concessions to the door, and window). In the bottom right hand corner is “1177 B.C. The Year Civilization Collapsed” — a brand new, and increasingly relevant study of a societal collapse. In between are books (including some 1st editions I want to brag about) which have shaped me, and which I trust my children will value when I am gone.

    A personal library can be more than just a set of books; it can be a thing of value in itself. As I’m sure you know!

  10. Tom Fisher says:

    I suppose when monks first started singing some old bishop whined, “Why do we need singing? Our Blessed Lord didn’t sing. We never had no singing when I was a lad

    Toad should read Augustine’s Confessions, he worried about exactly that question.

  11. toad says:

    No doubt I should, Tom.
    In fact, I will. I enjoy confessions. As long as they’re other people’s.


    No doubt the lady author shows this clip to her son, when he’s not “shooting the invaders,” to demonstrate how women ought to be handled.

  12. GC says:

    I should have thought the Church had singing from virtually the beginning, Mr Fisher. St Paul tells us so:

    Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery. Instead, be filled with the Spirit, speaking to one another with psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit. Sing and make music from your heart to the Lord, always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

    I believe St Augustine attributed much of his reconversion to the beauty of the church music of his time, but got a little scrupulous later in life, though not to the point of rejecting it.

  13. Tom Fisher says:

    Dear G.C.,

    Absolutely. But he did fret about it. Right near the end of the Confessions, he says he is still sometimes troubled by singing/music in the liturgy, and by his strong emotional response to it. Augustine is very open about the fact that he is giving his personal views, and not making doctrinal statements. — I think he was a man with a very strong aesthetic sense, and acutely aware (because of his own failings) of the spiritual danger that art can pose.

  14. toad says:

    “In this teaching and fostered expectation, the Church strengthens manhood and the leadership of man, and unto the greater good of the families and of the society and the authoritative State. …Or else.
    Don’t know about the rest of my army of friends on CP&S, but this stinks of naked, loathsome, Fascism to me. Where, (yes, I’ll say it yet again) everything not forbidden – is compulsory. (where are the sane voices of the likes of Bro. Burro, Raven and even Jabba – in of all this lunacy?

    Augustine seems to have been a Platonist in respect of music. OK. Why not?

    “Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery.” Quite right.
    Stick to gin and tonic, like a decent Christian.
    (…But take a little brandy – for thy stomach’s sake.)

  15. toad says:

    “Toad the Twit,” eh -JH? Not bad. One of your more profound comments, if you indeed made it up yourself. Or lifted it from G.K.Chesterton, possibly?.
    Mind if I use it against myself?
    A bit devastating, though. Hard to recover from such a stinging satirical blow.
    …But I will offer it up for the souls in Purgatory.
    Yes.
    That’s what I’ll do.

  16. GC says:

    No doubt the lady author shows this clip to her son, when he’s not “shooting the invaders,” to demonstrate how women ought to be handled.

    My Clare-born maternal grandmother, of the distinguished Kenny clan like Sir Anthony and Michael, was sometimes overheard by us to say ah! those were the days when men were men and women were glad they were.

    She didn’t appear to have been particularly oppressed or dragged about in earlier life, though her English-born protestant husband did abandon her and their three infant children in the late 1920s. She then ran a small rented corner shop to support her children, mother and an elder invalid brother. She never remarried, though she obtained an annulment eventually, and died at age 93. Her mother, a mother of 8 and twice widowed, died at 102 in the 1960s. (Her mother was a Kenny too who married a Kenny on the second time round – who was no evident relation – but Kennys were everywhere as a result and still are).

    I certainly can see the lady author’s point. A man should be and act as what he is by his nature. And a Christian man is a fine noble creature when his natural manly heroic virtues are further formed by those virtues of faith, hope, charity, meekness, generosity and self-sacrifice taught in the Scriptures. We see ample evidence of this in the lives of all our men saints and often enough in our own fathers. No need at all for lads to try to become fake “honorary women” or neuters, in spite of what the loonies in the media (and even retired media loonies) may try to force constantly upon us.

  17. johnhenrycn says:

    No Toad the Twit, I cannot claim to have made that up completely on my own. I had help from the Little Oxford Book of Word Origins in which “Toad” and “Twit” are consecutive entries on page 173, and it just occurred to me (for some reason I cannot explain) that they went very well together.

  18. johnhenrycn says:

    GC: It made me chuckle to see “No need at all for them to try to become fake ‘honorary women.'” When I was still a Proddie, I spent some time as our church librarian, which fell under the purview of our local United Church Women’s chapter, of which, perforce, I had to be an ex officio member😉

    Very interesting sketch of your Irish roots.

    And thank you (?) for fixing my HTML mistake at 04:43.

  19. toad says:

    One thing I do agree with the ghastly fascist woman over is that it is a shame women become soldiers. They should know better.
    No man in his right mind should become one either. “Thou shalt not kill,” someone once remarked. But sadly, sometimes there is literally no alternative way of making a living.
    I personally constantly thank God that I’ve never in my life had to put on a shiny uniform with brass buttons, waering a silly hat, marching in step with another thousand brain-washed robots, singing rude words to “Colonel Bogey,” carrying a gun, and shouting “Hoorah,” when ordered.
    …Let alone being trained in the most efficient way to kill another person – even if it’s only a woman.
    As, doubtless, the little boy in the article is being instructed by his “Special Forces” father..

  20. GC says:

    JH@18:48

    My Australian friends tell me that their menfolk don’t mind the new evolved set-up at all. They’re not complaining.

    They can go to a “venue” several times a week, meet long-contraceiving female aspiring company CEOs each time who are complete strangers, get taken home to their (the aspiring CEOs’) ample townhouses and apartments and just lie back and think of England. Brilliant as far as they’re concerned. A bonus is the media provide guidance often and tell them what they can learn techniques from the LGBTQIA community’s to enhance pleasure and performance.

    Apparently they don’t even really need to go to “venues” any more, as there are several “apps” they can readily acquire for their smartphones, which serve the same purpose.

  21. johnhenrycn says:

    Tom (09:14) – In the top left hand corner of the bookshelf in my study you would find the dog-eared and dusty books I have kept since earliest childhood; Alice (of course), The Wind in the Willows, and Pooh. The shelves wrap around the four walls…

    In about 1992, I started making, completely on my own using very basic tools, a solid oak bookcase, including little drawers and a recessed light fixture, which when i finished it a couple of years later, I hung suspended from my study’s ceiling above my writing desk. With its full complement of books, it must have weighed a ton or more. It was magnificent. I also buried a time capsule inside the crown moulding, with letters written by me, my wife and our children to be found by future owners of the house, or more likely by demolition contractors ultimately hired to knock it down a hundred or more years down the road. A few years later, we moved to the country where I built another solid oak bookcase, which also took two years to complete. Sadly, we also eventually left our country home. I’m now superstitious about building bookcases and only buy ready made ones from places like IKEA.

    Like you, I still have most of the books I bought or was given as a child. They weren’t quite up to the literary quality of your Alice books or Wind in the Willows. A very early acquisition was Tom Swift and His Deep-Sea Hydrodome:

  22. kathleen says:

    This is an brilliant article; Maike Hickson hits the nail on the head in everything she says.

    I remember a very insightful post from The Raven on CP&S some years ago about the Church, comparing the Western Church which has become modernised and feminised (since V2) and does little to attract men… and the Eastern Church which has remained unchanged and has, in consequence, rows of young men filling its ranks. (I saw this with my own eyes when visiting Eastern Europe.) The more traditional Catholic parishes, e.g., the ICKSP, the FSSP, even Opus Dei, and naturally, the SSPX, that have conserved and preach the unadulterated Catholic Faith, are the exceptions in the West; plenty of men there!

    Lots of nasty snarky comments from Toad under this article though! Not unusual of course – can one really expect a toad to know what a real man looks like? – but all the same, toads can be enormously tedious when they go on and on and on about their phantom hang ups from bygone days. (Yawn.)

    Still, our GC came to the rescue and in a few sentences put the record right. From her Granny, she repeats:
    “ah! those were the days when men were men and women were glad they were.”
    Wonderful! Mmm, that’s the way to talk. Give me a hunk like John Wayne any day (swoon), rather than one of those tattooed, ear-ringed fairies lisping their feminised platitudes that we see everywhere nowadays.

    One last idea: I have always thought of St Joseph – upright, honourable, protective, caring, dutiful, etc., – as the role model of the ‘perfect man’. Surely, this is why Heaven picked him out among all men to be the husband of the Virgin Mary and foster father of Our Blessed Lord.

  23. toad says:

    “Lots of nasty snarky comments from Toad under this article though! Not unusual of course – can one really expect a toad to know what a real man looks like? – “
    What a snarky comment! Funny, though.

    “Give me a hunk like John Wayne any day (swoon), rather than one of those tattooed, ear-ringed fairies …”
    i’m sure the tattooed fairies would agree with you, Kathleen. Say your prayers, and possibly Santa will bring you a swoon-making hunk of your own for “Xmas,” that you won’t have to share with any fairies.

  24. Tom Fisher says:

    weren’t quite up to the literary quality..

    It wasn’t all ‘golden-age’ stuff J.H. Do you remember this?

    A young boy builds a working rocket, my God I was jealous. Lads were real lads then of course, as Kathleen will happily tell us. My first communion gift was a book of Saints Lives, it was a reprint of a turn of the century book, I can’t remember the title, but the chapter which discussed the Crusades would probably be banned these days.🙂

  25. Tom Fisher says:

    One thing I do agree with the ghastly fascist woman over is that it is a shame women become soldiers. They should know better.

    Toad, I’m sure you’re a Wodehouse fan?

  26. toad says:

    Yes indeed, Tom. Waugh called him “The Master.”
    One of Bertie’s aunts has a voice like “..a squadron of cavalry galloping over a tin bridge.” Rather like Maike Hickson, I choose to imagine.
    Wodehouse’s world is one where God is dutifully put through His paces for an hour or so* each Sunday by the local vicar. And that’s all. Never seen, or heard of, the rest of the week. Disgraceful.

    * Viz: The Great Sermon Handicap.

  27. kathleen says:

    Toad @ 2:17 to me about my view of toads:

    “What a snarky comment!

    Yes, I suppose it was, Toad. But you, who suffer from “The Narcissist’s Dilemma” should expect such things. You know, dishing it out yourself, but unable to take it in return.😉

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/evolution-the-self/201110/the-narcissists-dilemma-they-can-dish-it-out

    Seriously though, the scourge of militant Feminism in the West is drowning us all, men and women, in its repurcussions. These fanatics, with their sluttish displays and violent aggression (e.g., their assault on the young men pacifically defending the Cathedral in Argentina not long ago) are a powerful force to be reckoned with nowadays. They do not talk for the majority of women, but many have been sucked up into their ideology, believing they are fighting for ‘women’s rights’ – and that is utter nonsense!

  28. toad says:

    Don’t be so silly, Kathleen! I said your “snarky” comment was funny, remember? Look again. I enjoyed it.
    This ridiculous idea that I can take it, but not dish it out, is another of your several, wish-fulfilling, fantasies. You clearly haven’t noticed, but Toad is far more insulting about himself than he is about anyone else on here*, And with good reason. He deserves it.
    So, continue to snark away – the snarkier the better!
    Toad will take it all “manfully,” on his manly little green chin.
    (Am I narcissistic? Very likely. Very spoiled by nuns as a child.)

    *Except about Rogerbert, of course.

  29. Tom Fisher says:

    the scourge of militant Feminism in the West is drowning us all, men and women, in its repurcussions

    Germaine Greer is now persona non grata apparently. Which some might see as an instance of a snake eating its own tail.

    But I’m pretty sure that militant feminism isn’t drowning any of us. We roll our eyes, and we go about our day. Militant Islam is what we need to concern ourselves with. And I’m sure most of us here agree about that.

  30. toad says:

    “But I’m pretty sure that militant feminism isn’t drowning any of us. We roll our eyes, and we go about our day. “
    Fie, Mr Fisher! Where’s your sense of finely-tuned Catholic paranoia? Anyway, it”s the Fanatical Feminist Freemasons we should be monitoring with horrified fascination. I reckon.

  31. kathleen says:

    Toad @ 9:17

    Well Toad, I do remember you getting incredibly “snarky” (or would you prefer me to call it “self-righteous” or “Bolshie”) when kind, patient, long-suffering commenters have been trying to sort out some of your bizarre opinions in comments of the not-too-distant past!
    Then we have JH, who goes right to the grain – good for him – but you protest loud and clear as we can see!
    And our inimitable GC sees right through you, giving amusing and artful responses showing up your inconsistencies, which make you stamp your little green foot and fly off the handle!😆

  32. Tom Fisher says:

    Where’s your sense of finely-tuned Catholic paranoia?

    I try my best, but the Freemasons do such a perfect impression of a bunch of overgrown schoolboys that I’m constantly taken in. Upsetting. Have to read Whiffle on The Care of the Pig to get back to my normal passivity.

  33. kathleen says:

    Tom @ 9:19

    But I’m pretty sure that militant feminism isn’t drowning any of us. We roll our eyes, and we go about our day. Militant Islam is what we need to concern ourselves with. And I’m sure most of us here agree about that.

    Ah, Tom, allow me to disagree with you here. Militant Feminism, together with the sickening PC line we are all forced to toe, and a dominating intolerant Secularism (that includes kow-towing to the LGBT agenda) are all the reasons the West has become so irremediably weak, morally corrupt and spineless.

    It is precisely because of this we have no defenses left now to combat the fanatical ideologies of Militant Islam. They are invading us by immigration and breeding, walking all over us with their vociferous demands [they are ‘allowed’ to be un-PC], and will eventually take over… unless a miracle occurs, and we well and truly make an about turn, placing Christ and Christendom on His rightful throne* once more.

    If/when that happens, we may not even need to ‘take up arms’, nor fire a single shot! We will be armed by the virtues, prayer and God’s protective Hand. Satanical Islam would no longer be a dangerous menace aimed at over-throwing us.

    *(Sounds like an unreal Utopia right now though, with the downward spiral we are trapped in!)

  34. toad says:

    Excellently and manfully said, Kathleen.
    And so we will happily continue with “The Trad Team,” taaking turns to reduce Toad to impotent, incoherent, spluttering rage and discomfiture at regular intervals.
    Teach the ancient, impudent, tiny green scoundrel right – to imagine he can treat CP&S in cavalier fashion and not get his arse kicked from here to “Xmas”!

  35. Tom Fisher says:

    We have no defenses left now to combat the fanatical ideologies of Militant Islam.

    I agree Kathleen, and although it’s almost a cliche now, I’ll quote that famous couplet from Yeats;

    The best lack all conviction, while the worst
    Are full of passionate intensity.

    I think you are probably (partly) right to chide me for dismissing ‘militant feminism’ – are you familiar with Mark Steyn? He’s a Canadian writer with some interesting views (not all of which I agree with) about the future of the west.

    http://www.amazon.com/America-Alone-The-World-Know/dp/1596985275

  36. Tom Fisher says:

    taking turns to reduce Toad to impotent, incoherent, spluttering rage and discomfiture at regular intervals.

    I’m sure we have nothing to say about incoherence, or spluttering. And God forbid we discuss impotence. But however much the discomfort of Toad may be entertaining, I’m sure we’re yet to see rage. Is there a particularly furious editorial from the Toledo Claymore you might share?

  37. kathleen says:

    Sounds like a fascinating (if scary) read, Tom. Yes, I have heard of Mark Steyn; he’s an author with a clear vision of the predicament and danger we Westerners have allowed ourselves to get into.

    I also recommend the great link to an article by Jeff Walker that Michael gives on another thread of comments – very relevant to this topic!

    https://jeffwalker.wordpress.com/2015/11/20/there-is-no-other-stream-how-we-forgot-our-song/

  38. Tom Fisher says:

    Kathleen, thanks for the link – I would not have come across it otherwise. I’m only half way through reading it – but already this phrase has caught my attention;

    We are committing suicide while wandering through a fog of our own choosing

  39. toad says:

    Rage, Tom?
    I’ll admit to mild irritation once or twice. Which I regret.
    Maybe I should be raging at the dying of the light, as I’m now half-blind. But it’s not worth the effort.
    The “Claymore”? Rusty Old Paper Knife, these days.
    I have sometimes chided my readers on their love of guns and cars.
    …Which they did not appreciate.

    A lot of them love God too, in hundreds of different varieties.

  40. toad says:

    “The best lack all conviction, while the worst
    Are full of passionate intensity”.

    Fie, Tom! Surely all on CP&S are filled with passionate intensity (except Toad, of course) are they any the worst for that?
    No. Not a bit. What an idea!

  41. toad says:

    “We have no defenses left now to combat the fanatical ideologies of Militant Islam.”
    Clear;y no point in trying logic and reason. No, we need the romance of knights in armour with scarlet crosses on their shields. With a celestial hand from Santiago Matamoros.
    We are doomed. But then, we’re always doomed by something or other.

    Very interesting link from Kathleen – Nov. 23 at 11.29. I read somewhere that philanthropists like Bill Gates. by pumping billions into successfully reducing infant mortality in Africa and elsewhere, have “created” a vast army of healthy young people with nothing to do, no work, no future. Not even Nike sweatshops. So they become terrorists like Boko Haram and Isis. Then they kill people and go to paradise.
    Don’t know if that’s true or not, but it makes sense. Funny old world – innit?

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