How To Deal With The Highly Damnable

Terrorists are nothing more than manipulative attention seekers who have lost their souls and humanity by choosing the ends before the means.

We must stop playing their game: we need low key and unemotional reporting of their atrocities, coupled with the most effective possible counter-terrorism measures.

Starve them of the oxygen they need to thrive: our TERROR. You know it makes sense.

About Brother Burrito

A sinner who hopes in God's Mercy, and who cannot stop smiling since realizing that Christ IS the Way , the Truth and the Life. Alleluia!
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26 Responses to How To Deal With The Highly Damnable

  1. JabbaPapa says:

    Prayers for Fr. Jacques Hamel.

  2. Roger says:

    Charles Foucauld

    “..Charles de Foucauld develops an analysis of the effectiveness of colonization. In a letter to René Bazin he says that there is a profound incompatibility between Islam and the assimilation of Muslims in France. Not that people can not move as many thought in his time, and which opposes Charles, but because he believes that Muslims “Islam look like a real country” The policy of assimilation of Muslims it seems impossible, especially no effort for education and example of life is made for people. ..”

    Thus he says in his letter that “If we were not able to make these French people, they will chase us. The only way they become French is that they become Christians ”

    We can replace France with any Western Nation including USA and the Anti Christian Laws. Pluralism (Masonic Pluralism) has created a fertile soil for Terror.

  3. Roger says:

    I second Jabba’s entry!
    France needs to be Consecrated to the Sacred Heart!

  4. toadspittle says:

    “We must stop playing their game: we need low key and unemotional reporting of their atrocities, coupled with the most effective possible counter-terrorism measures.”
    And then the media will be accused of downplaying, and even ignoring the atrocities.

  5. johnhenrycn says:

    Roger (12:38) – at first I was thinking you probably know foucaul about Foucauld, but I was wrong, and indeed, I would not have known about that good man without your comment.

  6. johnhenrycn says:

    …oh, and thank you for posting a comment without mentioning anything to do with Portugal.

  7. johnhenrycn says:

    BB: Are not “the most effective possible counter-terrorism measures” actually targeted assassinations of likely terrorists à la the Minority Report, or *disappearing* their known sympathizers à la the last Argentine dictatorship – or do you think that defeating terrorism is secondary to the Rule of Law? You can’t have both.

  8. Tom Fisher says:

    Are not “the most effective possible counter-terrorism measures” actually targeted assassinations of likely terrorists à la the Minority Report, or *disappearing* their known sympathizers à la the last Argentine dictatorship

    JH, I recognise the point you are making. But, as a point of interest, those measures are only effective with respect to identifying and eliminating people who are in fact terrorists. However the root the cause of terrorism, axiomatically, is whatever it is that makes people come to see it as legitimate and desirable in the first place. Every time a targeted* drone strike hits a village in Yemen, or Afghanistan, and kills its target plus 5 innocents, a shock-wave of grief and anger radiates through the local community. To put it another way, Tertullian, though speaking about something infinitely more noble, made a point which can be more generally applied when he said Semen est sanguis Christianorum

    *Targeting is very hard, and ‘surgical strikes’ aren’t that surgical

  9. toadspittle says:

    Interesting re: Foucauld. He was right, I suspect – although I’d suggest the only way the Algerian (or whatever) Muslims will become French, is by becoming French – that is adopting the current French* way of life. Which, nowadays, is secular, pluralistic, and tolerant – in the main.
    But they won’t. Not in the foreseeable future. Because they believe that they and they alone are living God’s way, and that the West is a festering den of iniquity, obscenity, and sin.
    What an extraordinary idea!

    *French, or German, or Dutch, or British – take your pick.

  10. johnhenrycn says:

    You are entirely correct, Tom Fisher. I was pretending to be Socrates when I posted at 21:37.

  11. Tom Fisher says:

    JH, picking up on the point you were making, I think that BB has made a rare stumble here:

    We must stop playing their game: we need low key and unemotional reporting of their atrocities, coupled with the most effective possible counter-terrorism measures.

    As you say most effective can lead us to some dark places, — but I don’t agree with low key and unemotional reporting either. The brutal murder of a priest, in his church, should be reported with intense emotion. The French newspapers (secular by and large) which published editions with black borders were right to do so. I think that the real sign that evil is winning will be when we become so numb to such atrocities that are able to cover them in a ‘low key’ way.

  12. JabbaPapa says:

    It is interesting that so many Muslims heeded the call to attend Mass in France yesterday — including, somewhat surprisingly, in the heart of the Ariane Muslim ghetto in Nice !!

    There are continued reports of a flow of conversions to Christianity in Africa, sometimes in secret for fear of reprisals, and it would be quite fascinating if similar began to occur in Europe …

    The taboo in Islam against attending a Christian Worship Rite is a powerful one, and the Holy Spirit could surely make use of the fact that so many have now broken it.

  13. johnhenrycn says:

    Again, you are entirely correct, TF. However, I do miss the days when the BBC reported the news with a stiff upper lip – which is to say unemotionally – but those days are long gone.

  14. Tom Fisher says:

    I do miss the days when the BBC reported the news with a stiff upper lip – which is to say unemotionally

    Indeed, and at least the convention used to be that facts were reported with minimal emotive flourishes — rather than the facts being massaged (or simply left unmentioned) to avoid producing negative emotions (an idiotic phrase)

  15. johnhenrycn says:

    Jabba (07:55) – I remember our old pal Benedict Carter (a former co-owner of this blog if memory serves) saying that he would never attend a non-Catholic worship service. He was a Catholic revert and perhaps that explains his prejudice; but as a Catholic convert (which I recall you are too) I only draw the line at taking *communion* in Protestant places because Christian devotion can be found there too. I continue to read Protestant tracts almost daily. I go to synagogues and hope to go to a mosque and to a Hindu temple someday, although in those latter cases only for the cultural experience I hope you understand. Here’s a beautiful Hindu temple just up the road from where I live. Never actually set foot inside it yet:

  16. JabbaPapa says:

    I doubt that I’ll ever attend a non-Catholic religious Rite either, though I would not absolutely refuse to in every imaginable circumstance.

    Catholics are generally forbidden from doing so, as Vatican II itself reiterated, although with proper Episcopal approval some ecumenical gatherings may be attended, to pray for Christian Unity.

  17. johnhenrycn says:

    Nothing wrong with that, Jabba; but personally, I’d sooner cut off my right hand than deprive my life of the devotional works of Oswald Chambers,

    poor ignorant Baptist though he was.

  18. Tom Fisher says:

    I attended an Anglican service, and went so far as to deliver a short and dull speech earlier this year. But when all my sins are laid before me, I imagine that my more exciting stumbles will take priority

  19. Tom Fisher says:

    the devotional works of Oswald Chambers

    I had never heard of him JH. But thanks to the internet I’m catching up. Thanks for sharing him with us

  20. kathleen says:

    the devotional works of Oswald Chambers

    I had never heard of him JH. But thanks to the internet I’m catching up.

    Ditto, Tom!
    A fine looking man, whose heart and soul were most certainly touched by Christ according to his biography.

    And of course C. S. Lewis is another non-Catholic “gem” whose inspired writings unwittingly led thousands into the Catholic Church.

    But let’s not get Toad started on that one……😉

  21. johnhenrycn says:

    Actually, Kathleen, I think that Chambers and that wonderful Irish priest who also died whilst shepherding soldiers in WW1 had a lot in common. Said priest’s name will come to me the minute after I post this comment.
    ___
    Entirely off topic, but let me ask this of people with deeper knowledge of relics than I possess:
    On Saturday, whilst no one was looking, I slowly and gently pulled a set of Rosary beads through the sand covering the grave of the flesh of Jean de Brébeuf and Gabriel Lalemant. They are buried together in one grave.Their bones reside elsewhere. Is that set of Rosary beads now a second or a third class relic?

  22. johnhenrycn says:

    Yes, Fr Willie Doyle.

  23. kathleen says:

    Ah, JH, the WW1 hero, Fr Willie Doyle – a very special heavenly friend of mine!🙂

    Re, relics… I think that your Rosary would now be classed as a “third class relic“, having been touched to the earth of the fleshy remains of those two great Canadian martyrs and saints. I possess a few of those too – third class relics, I mean. Although it might be that many of us are also in the possession of second class relics of uncanonised saints without knowing it, by owning objects that once belonged to saintly members of our family and friends who have left this world and gone home to Heaven!

    (I wonder what the opposite would be called, i.e., owning objects belonging to BB’s referred to “highly damnable”?😯 )

  24. piliersdelaterre says:

    Yesterday I went to Notre Dame des Neiges, the trappist monastery in the Cévennes, where Robert Louis Stevenson (and Modestine) stayed once, and where De Foucauld began his religious Life in 1890. During Mass I learned that the Imams of France had ordered their congregations to attend masses to honour Fr Jaques Hamel.
    If this isn’t a kind of miracle, what is?
    (Being in that special place was another, with the cows, and donkeys wandering about, wearing their gentle bells, which echoed among the mountains and forests surrounding the monastery)

  25. Tom Fisher says:

    During Mass I learned that the Imams of France had ordered their congregations to attend masses to honour Fr Jaques Hamel.
    If this isn’t a kind of miracle, what is?

    Douglas Murray provides some context:

    http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/08/post-terror-good-news-story-came-islams-persecuted-sect/?_ga=1.20780797.431645476.1442776194

  26. kathleen says:

    Thanks for that interesting link, Tom. It most certainly does put this supposed “good news” story firmly in context. I knew there was something fishy about it from the start, for as we know, real followers of Mohammad are not allowed to worship in a Catholic Church with infidels. (And anyway, “a few dozen Muslims” is hardly representative of the millions now living in France.)

    We’ve been spoofed again by the Islamic-run BBC!

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