Why the Latin Mass is Bringing Young People Back to Mass

It has long been noted that the numbers of young Catholics who fall away from the practice of their Catholic faith in these last 50 years or so continues on a steep downward trend. Yet these are, in their great majority, the youth who have been brought up with the Novus Ordo Mass and its accompanying social doctrine, often more akin to the ideology of an NGO than the true teachings of the Holy Catholic Church. Metaphorically speaking, they have been fed mere crumbs instead of the most sumptious banquet, so is it really so surprising?

The Novus Ordo rite is a Mass that cannot nourish the soul in the same way as the sublime Traditional Latin Mass, despite the best efforts of many good priests who do their best to celebrate it with devotion. Nor can the Novus Ordo Mass with its weak and community-orientated liturgy lift the spirit heavenwards with the same trascendant awe and mystery as the holy Latin Mass, the Mass of the Ages.

However, all is not lost; we are now seeing another trend in recent times, a most promising one. Many young people, and even some who are not so young, are finding (or returning to) the Catholic Faith once they discover the treasures hidden in the holy sacrifice of the Traditional Latin Mass.

Let’s find out what some of them have to say…

Below is a longer explanation from an interview by Taylor Marshall: “Why LATIN MASS Attracts Youth Back to Mass”

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10 Responses to Why the Latin Mass is Bringing Young People Back to Mass

  1. Thank you very much for this timely and inspiring article! I’m going to reblog this because I’m compelled by the Holy Spirit. I will say this when I have attended Latin Mass I’m so touched deep in my heart and soul that I tear and when the choir sings I feel closer to heaven, they sing so beautiful and I’m blessed to be able to participate in such a Mass.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Reblogged this on Zero Lift-Off and commented:
    Why the Latin Mass is Bringing Young People Back to Mass
    Posted on June 7, 2020 by Catholicism Pure & Simple
    Thank you very much for this timely and inspiring article! I’m going to reblog this because I’m compelled by the Holy Spirit. I will say this when I have attended Latin Mass I’m so touched deep in my heart and soul that I tear and when the choir sings I feel closer to heaven, they sing so beautiful and I’m blessed to be able to participate in such a Mass.
    The following part of the article that I wanted to quote is so direct to the truth and heart of the matter as I see this need, so my prayers go out to you and I ask God through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ to bring this to fruition for all our young and old who feel the Lord in their hearts calling them closer!
    Brother in Christ,
    Lawrence Morra
    “The Novus Ordo rite is a Mass that cannot nourish the soul in the same way as the sublime Traditional Latin Mass, despite the best efforts of many good priests who do their best to celebrate it with devotion. Nor can the Novus Ordo Mass with its weak and community-orientated liturgy lift the spirit heavenwards with the same trascendant awe and mystery as the holy Latin Mass, the Mass of the Ages.
    However, all is not lost; we are now seeing another trend in recent times, a most promising one. Many young people, and even some who are not so young, are finding (or returning to) the Catholic Faith once they discover the treasures hidden in the holy sacrifice of the Traditional Latin Mass.”

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Speaking as a young person, what I find attractive about the old Mass is the structure and reverence with which it is celebrated. It gives an almost ethereal perspective as to what is happening. One can clearly perceive they are taking part of something that is otherworldly. But perhaps the best aspect of the TLM is the reverence with which the Holy Eucherist is treated. Our Lord is enshrined exactly where He should be, in the tabernacle, His throne, facing His people. God bless our hard working traditional priests, especially in these trying times.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Pingback: Young People, TLM, the Dowry of Mary, and America’s Patron Saint | nebraskaenergyobserver

  5. Irony is that many Catholics that I know had a special place for the Latin Mass. The one beef of many is that they dont know enough Latin!

    Liked by 4 people

  6. @Crusader4Christ I must say as you pointed out your being a young person you have a beautiful perception and insight of the TLM and explained so well how moving and reverential the whole Mass is as it does for me what you mentioned; “It gives an almost ethereal perspective as to what is happening. One can clearly perceive they are taking part of something that is otherworldly.” That is what participating in such a Mass does for me and I’ve often been brought to tears feeling my own need to be humbled and thankful for His love and forgiveness; feeling profoundly the presence of God the Father, Jesus His Son and the Holy Ghost! The choir always taps into my deepest feelings in my heart and I feel the grace through God’s love pouring out to those who are there during such a Mass. I studied Lain for two years but still don’t know enough and as another of the commenters mentions how many complain that is a drawback to them not knowing or understanding a word in some cases I’m sure; but just following translation over time from a missal would be fine to me too, as eventually much more would become familiar. But the actual powerful sense of connection to God during the Mass is so profound and real that in itself that makes the Mass all the more fulfilling as well as purifying! Keep up the good faith you have and may God’s blessings be with you always! Amen!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. johnhenrycn says:

    Lawrence is such a delightful contributor to CP&S. His thoughts on Bringing Young People Back to Mass touched me. He brings to mind The Mass Explained To Children by Maria Montessori (Nihil Obstat, Westmonasterii, Die XXA JUNII, MCMXXXII) for the really young, but also – if I may be so bold and not offensive – The Mass in Slow Motion by Ronald Knox (Nihil Obstat, Westmonasterii, Die 24A MAII, 1948). I look forward to discussing both of these works with Lawrence when he is discharged.

    Like

  8. johnhenrycn says:

    Freemattpodcast (22:50) laments that many Catholics don’t know enough Latin. Speaking for myself, that is true. I will likely go to my grave without confessing that I cheated on my Latin exams in school. Just a venial sin, after all. But people ought to understand that participating in The Latin Mass does not mean one must understand and speak Latin in the vernacular. Memorizing is ok.

    For those interested in the present place of our ancient tongue in the Church, here’s a wonderful essay published 3 years ago: https://newcriterion.com/issues/2017/3/the-vaticans-latinist
    about the magnificent Fr Reginald Foster, plumber’s son and supreme Latinist, who died and went to Heaven a few weeks ago.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow thank you Mr. Morra! I appreciate you sharing your thoughts. We must never forget the grace of inestimable value that is the Holy Mass. God love you!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Crusader4Christ You’re very welcome and I add you deserve thanks as I see it, because you brought to my attention as I’m sure you did so many others very eloquently how the pronounced reverence of the old Mass brings such a harmony and great sense of closeness to our Lord as you put it so well, “gives an almost ethereal perspective.” I will always look forward to seeing your fine faithful input in these trends on this site! Yes, our precious and wonderful Holy Mass brings us such an abundance of grace. Amen. God love you!

    Like

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