The troubling statements of Pope Francis

June 3, 2016 (LifeSiteNews)

Two weeks ago the latest controversial interview with Pope Francis hit the press, this time in France with the daily newspaper La Croix. Contrary to the teaching of previous popes, such as Leo XIII in Libertas and Pius XI in Quas PrimasPope Francis said, “States must be secular. Confessional states end badly. That goes against the grain of History.” In the same interview, Francis suggested a comparison between Christianity and Islamic adherents’ use of conquest to impose their beliefs. “It is true that the idea of conquest is inherent in the soul of Islam,” he said. “However, it is also possible to interpret the objective in Matthew’s Gospel, where Jesus sends his disciples to all nations, in terms of the same idea of conquest.”

The shocking statements reminded me of the very first leaked Q&A with Pope Francis at the beginning of his papacy. It’s an interview remembered most for the pope’s admission that there is a “gay lobby” inside the Vatican. Despite the fact that such explosive news would have been huge for LifeSiteNews, you won’t find that first interview covered on LifeSiteNews anywhere near the date of its release. I simply could not believe it to be authentic or accurate – not because of the ‘gay lobby’ comment – but because the Pope had spoken disparagingly about a spiritual bouquet of rosaries he had received upon his election.

Pope Francis was quoted as saying:

It concerns me; when I was elected, I received a letter from one of these groups, and they said: “Your Holiness, we offer you this spiritual treasure: 3,525 rosaries.” Why don’t they say, “we pray for you, we ask…”, but this thing of counting… And these groups return to practices and to disciplines that I lived through – not you, because you are not old – to disciplines, to things that in that moment took place, but not now, they do not exist today…

“There is no way,” I remember thinking to myself, “a Pope would ever say anything slighting the rosary.” That aspect of the interview made me question whether any of it was authentic. Thus, I resisted the pressure to publish a story on the Pope’s remarks on the ‘gay lobby’ in the Vatican. A few weeks later I was in Rome and finally got a chance to ask someone in the know about the leaked interview. I was shocked to hear: “of course it was true.” It was, I was told, the first example of a new communications method employed by the Pope using different channels.

That sense, of “there’s no way a pope could ever say such a thing,” has resurfaced time and again over the last few years, and not only from the Holy Father’s off-the-cuff and leaked interviews. Even in official teachings such as his Angelus addresses and homilies at big events, Pope Francis has shocked Catholic sensibilities. Such as the Angelus of June 2, 2013, where he spoke about Christ’s miracle of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes as taking place by “sharing.” “This is the miracle: rather than a multiplication it is a sharing, inspired by faith and prayer,” he said.

He was even more explicit about it in July of last year in a homily preached in Christ the Redeemer Square in Bolivia. Pope Francis said, “This is how the miracle takes place. It is not magic or sorcery. … Jesus managed to generate a current among his followers: they all went on sharing what was their own, turning it into a gift for the others; and that is how they all got to eat their fill. Incredibly, food was left over: they collected it in seven baskets.”

There have been many of these jarring incidents. Here is a list of some of them:

– In July 2013 when a reporter asked why during his trip to Brazil he failed to speak of abortion and homosexuality despite the fact that the nation had just approved laws concerning these matters, the Pope replied: “The Church has already spoken quite clearly on this. It was unnecessary to return to it, just as I didn’t speak about cheating, lying, or other matters on which the Church has a clear teaching!”

– In an October 2013 interview with La Repubblica, Pope Francis was reported to have said: “The most serious of the evils that afflict the world these days are youth unemployment and the loneliness of the old…  the most urgent problem that the Church is facing.” In the same interview he said: “Proselytism is solemn nonsense, it makes no sense.” And also: “I believe in God, not in a Catholic God, there is no Catholic God, there is God and I believe in Jesus Christ, his incarnation.”

– The November 2013 Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium was similar to the Repubblica interview in that the Pope focuses on “two great issues” that, he says, “will shape the future of humanity.” “These issues are first, the inclusion of the poor in society, and second, peace and social dialogue,” he wrote.

– In the 2014 book on Pope Francis, The Great Reformer, we learn from papal biographer Austin Ivereigh that Tony Palmer, an Anglican and long time friend of Pope Francis, spoke to then-Cardinal Bergoglio about whether he should become Catholic. Mr. Palmer described the then-Cardinal’s response as: “[Bergoglio] told me that we need to have bridge-builders. He counseled me not to take the step because it looked like I was choosing a side and I would cease to be a bridge-builder.”

– In January of 2015 came the “don’t breed like rabbits” in-flight interview on his return from Manila. Speaking of a woman he knows who was pregnant with her eighth child after having the first seven by C-section, he said he had “rebuked” her, saying, “But do you want to leave seven orphans? That is to tempt God!” “That is an irresponsibility,” he added, “God gives you methods to be responsible.” Pope Francis then said, “Some think that, excuse me if I use that word, that in order to be good Catholics we have to be like rabbits.” He added, “No. Responsible parenthood!”

– In March 2015 came another interview with Repubblica in which the Pope seemed to suggest no person could go to hell, but if they fully rejected God they would be annihilated. The article says: “What happens to that lost soul? Will it be punished? And how? The response of Francis is distinct and clear: there is no punishment, but the annihilation of that soul.  All the others will participate in the beatitude of living in the presence of the Father. The souls that are annihilated will not take part in that banquet; with the death of the body their journey is finished.”

– There was some controversy over Repubblica’s Scalfari interview. The Vatican would neither verify nor deny it in its specific parts, but nevertheless published it in the Vatican newspaper, and on the Vatican website. It was later deleted from the website, only to republish it again, then delete it again. Vatican watchers compared the most controversial part regarding the impossibility of people going to hell for all eternity to the statement from the Pope’s latest exhortation Amoris Laetitia, in which he said, “No one can be condemned for ever, because that is not the logic of the Gospel!”

– In a February 2016 interview with one of Italy’s most prominent dailies, Corriere Della Sera, Pope Francis praised Italy’s leading proponent of abortion, Emma Bonino, as one of the nation’s “forgotten greats,” comparing her to great historical figures such as Konrad Adenauer and Robert Schuman. The Pope praised her for her work with refugees from Africa. Bonino was famously arrested for illegal abortions and then became a politician who has led the fight for the legalization of abortion, euthanasia, homosexual “marriage,” legalization of recreational drugs, graphic sex education, and more.

– On February 18, 2016 on the papal plane returning from Mexico, the Pope commented on Donald Trump during the Presidential Primaries.  “A person who only thinks about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges, is not Christian,” he said, according to a transcript of his remarks. In the same press scrum, the Pope said he would not comment on Italy’s same-sex civil union legislation “because the pope is for everybody and he can’t insert himself in the specific internal politics of a country.”

This small sampling gives enough reason why faithful Catholics who love the Church and the Holy Father are concerned. They are so concerned they are overcoming the natural reticence to criticize the actions of the Pope – the Vicar of Christ on earth. With reverence and love, with prayer and prudence—as well as the pain of children questioning their father—they are beginning to speak with greater boldness, sensing that the result of remaining silent about the current trajectory implies acquiescence and even approval, which would only contribute to the spreading ambiguities about the meaning of morality, faith and salvation.

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28 Responses to The troubling statements of Pope Francis

  1. toadspittle says:

    “I believe in God, not in a Catholic God, there is no Catholic God, there is God and I believe in Jesus Christ, his incarnation.”
    Is that “shocking nonsense”? Doesn’t seem so to me. Just a simple statement of fact.

  2. JabbaPapa says:

    Contrary to the teaching of previous popes, such as Leo XIII in Libertas and Pius XI in Quas Primas, Pope Francis said, “States must be secular. Confessional states end badly. That goes against the grain of History.”

    errrmmmm … NO, his statement “contradicts” those frequently misinterpreted and mistranslated documents not at all.

    Those documents establish the Papal Sovereignty in matters of religious Authority, as well as firmly establishing the secular Authorities each in their own Rights, separate from the Church and the Pontiff.

    Francis suggested a comparison between Christianity and Islamic adherents’ use of conquest to impose their beliefs. “It is true that the idea of conquest is inherent in the soul of Islam,” he said. “However, it is also possible to interpret the objective in Matthew’s Gospel, where Jesus sends his disciples to all nations, in terms of the same idea of conquest.”

    Yes, and take note what this actually means : the idea of conquest is inherent in the soul of Islam, but in Matthew’s Gospel such an idea can only derive from a particular interpretation.

    The difference between the two is radical.

    That sense, of “there’s no way a pope could ever say such a thing,” has resurfaced time and again over the last few years

    It’s a nasty little game of “spot how I’m more Catholic than the Pope” which BTW started early into the pontificate of Benedict XVI. For a more balanced perspective on this nonsense : http://www.eyeofthetiber.com/2016/02/18/francis-declares-plane-interviews-new-authoritative-form-of-magisterial-teaching/

    Popes have personal opinions on this or that, same as any other Catholics — it is no big deal if a Pope should suggest things one disagrees with.

    Even in official teachings such as his Angelus addresses and homilies at big events

    Homilies are NOT “official teachings”, and it is not Catholic to suggest that they are, particularly not when this is said in a manner to encourage disrespect of the Petrine Ministry.

    Pope Francis said, “This is how the miracle takes place. It is not magic or sorcery. … Jesus managed to generate a current among his followers: they all went on sharing what was their own, turning it into a gift for the others; and that is how they all got to eat their fill. Incredibly, food was left over: they collected it in seven baskets.”

    The core of the Miracle is its Eucharistic Mystery — howsoever the Lord may have chosen to effectuate the multiplication of the loaves and fishes is entirely secondary, as is clear BTW in the Lord’s stern Admonition of those who turned up the following day in the expectation of whatever superficially miraculous :

    John {6:26} Jesus answered them and said: “Amen, amen, I say to you, you seek me, not because you have seen signs, but because you have eaten from the bread and were satisfied.
    {6:27} Do not work for food that perishes, but for that which endures to eternal life, which the Son of man will give to you. For God the Father has sealed him.”

    I don’t necessarily agree with the Holy Father’s means of expressing a particular truth about the Reality of the Divine Nature as it surrounds us, and can even act through us, for it is not easy to understand that all that is mundane is the greatest of all the miracles except the incarnation of our souls and the Incarnation of the Lord as one of us, and that the major miracles occur according to God’s Will alone; not our mere convenience.

    A major miracle is an astonishing thing to experience, as it can bypass or defy the ordinary laws of Nature ; but those Laws are of the same Divine Origin, and so it is only from our own flawed perspectives that the mundane and the miraculous could be viewed as if different to each other.

    Meanwhile : Meeting May 9 with Cardinal Angelo Amato, prefect of the Congregation for Saints’ Causes, the pope signed decrees recognizing miracles attributed to the intercession of Blessed Guillaume-Nicolas-Louis Leclerq, who was martyred during the infamous September Massacres in Paris in 1792, and Blessed Ludovico Pavoni, the Italian priest who founded the Sons of Mary Immaculate, now commonly known as the Pavonians.

    In an October 2013 interview with La Repubblica, Pope Francis was reported to have said ; In March 2015 came another interview with Repubblica — oh PLEASE !!! I’d trust that particular journalist’s “reports” (AKA inventions) just about as far as I could throw them.

    Anyone expecting perfection and some sort of “living sainthood” in a Pope or in anyone who is not the Lord or His Holy Mother is just kidding himself ; I can only encourage you to read the extremely lucid analyses of several actual Saints of their own serious imperfections of all kinds ; I personally am attached to the writings of Saint Bernadette Soubirous on the topic.

    Popes can and will make their own mistakes and have their own flaws ; this certainly does not justify typing up such articles of some rather astonishing calumny and sheer negativity.

  3. JabbaPapa says:

    Toad : “I believe in God, not in a Catholic God, there is no Catholic God, there is God and I believe in Jesus Christ, his incarnation.”
    Is that “shocking nonsense”? Doesn’t seem so to me. Just a simple statement of fact.

    Quite — looking at the original language rather than translation, it is clear that the Pope was warning about the common temptation of erecting the Scripture and the Dogma into a God made solely of Religion, instead of understanding that the Living Revelation is the Christ of the Lord, and those things come from Him, not the other way round. He was warning against the Pharisaic temptation, which is deeply similar to Modernism.

  4. JabbaPapa says:

    And :

    http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2016/01/12/pope_francis_the_prayers_of_the_faithful_work_miracles/1200505

    The Pope also recalled the story of a man in Buenos Aires whose 9-year-old-daughter was dying in hospital. He said he spent the night at the shrine of the Virgin of Luján clinging to the gate and praying for the grace of healing. The next morning, when he returned to the hospital, his daughter was healed:

    “Prayer works miracles; it works miracles for Christians, whether they be faithful laypeople, priests, bishops who have lost compassion. The prayers of the faithful change the Church: it’s not us popes, bishops, priests or nuns who carry the Church forward, but Saints. Saints are those who dare to believe that God is the Lord and that He can do everything” Pope Francis concluded.

  5. Robert says:

    Pure Masonry and what is worse justifying masonic double speak!

    St Aquinas the four great prayers.
    Our Father
    Hail Mary
    Glory Be
    The CREED
    By the Way read and safe guard Leo XIII letters and encyclicals!
    Leo XIII wrote FOUR encyclicals on the Rosary.

  6. Robert says:

    My apologies

    Twelve Rosary Encyclicals by Pope Leo XIII (1883-1898)

    “..During his years as pope (1878-1903), Leo XIII wrote many significant encyclicals. His 1891 encyclical, On the Condition of Labor, initiated the Church’s modern social teachings. He also wrote on the teaching of the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas in schools and seminaries, on the study of the Bible, on the Holy Spirit, and on St. Joseph; at the turn of the century, he wrote two encyclicals on Christ (the Sacred Heart, the Redeemer). He addressed specific political situations in which the Church’s liberties were threatened. The theme to which he returned most frequently in the final years of the last century was the rosary.

    The rosary was the subject for twelve encyclicals and five apostolic letters. Beginning in 1883 and concluding in 1898, an encyclical on the rosary appeared almost every year, usually in preparation for the month of October. In the last of the rosary encyclicals (1898), he wrote, “We have never ceased to encourage the constant use of the rosary among Christians, by publishing every year since September, 1883, an encyclical letter on this subject, besides frequently issuing decrees.” (Pope John XXIII’s encyclical, Grata Recordatio, 1961, spoke of the “pleasant memory” of hearing those encyclicals read every October.)

    The rosary encyclicals can be divided into two groups: 1883-1885 and 1891-1898. The first group established the rosary as a public devotion. The first encyclical (1883) prescribed the public recitation of the rosary and the Litany of Loreto in Catholic churches and chapels as a special observance “for the month of October of this year.” Encouraged by the reception of the observance for 1883, the encyclicals for 1884 and 1885 directed that October devotions be continued. The feast of the Most Holy Rosary was given a higher liturgical standing. The invocation “Queen of the holy Rosary” was added to the Litany of Loreto. This encouragement of the public recitation of the rosary in churches conferred a new status on the rosary. ..”

  7. “There’s no way a pope could ever say such a thing.” Really? But Bergoglio could – and did – say them.

    A friend commented: “Dear God, once again I have to ask: what did we do to deserve this? How long is the Church to be punished by having this Bergoglio character occupy the Chair of Peter?”

  8. Marai says:

    On the surface some of these statements look surprising or even troubling – but they do not contradict Catholic teaching – he is simply omitting to say that which creates ‘walls’ not ‘bridges’; it may be shocking to praise the good works one has done and fail to mention the grave sins – but it is still not contravening Catholic teaching. The danger of misinterpretation of his words though is the worrying thing.
    He throws caution to the winds – but the spirit is still blowing.

  9. Robert says:

    [The Moderator – Too far, Roger.]

  10. johnhenrycn says:

    This is a thought-provoking, indeed provocative, post; and LifeSiteNews is to be commended for pulling together these numerous (and fair) examples of excursions taken by Pope Francis to the peripheries of The Faith; but I’m inclined (albeit with some unease) to consider them as only that: excursions to the peripheries – not doctrine – and I’m in substantial agreement with JP’s rather dense (in a positive sense) rebuttal to the LSN’s negative interpretations. I hope to continue sharing my “thoughts” with you later today.

  11. Brother Burrito says:

    Dear Jabba,

    I have just read all your comments of today.

    Can I propose you for the title of “Malleus Maleficarum” for 2016?😉

    We may have had our differences in the past, but I am a total fan of your recent defence of orthodoxy and our Holy Father.

    Any Catholic who attacks the ruling Pontiff needs their head examining IMHO. Only God Almighty can assassinate the Pope, or am I misunderstanding things again? I can be so simple minded.

    God love you.

  12. toadspittle says:

    “I believe in God, not in a Catholic God, there is no Catholic God, there is God and I believe in Jesus Christ, his incarnation.”

    Which is it better to be? A “bad” Catholic – or a “good” Methodist?
    No question really – is there?

  13. toadspittle says:

    (I should point out that my comment above is my idea of what Francis is subtly getting at.)

  14. kathleen says:

    “Any Catholic who attacks the ruling Pontiff needs their head examining IMHO.”

    Who (says K looking to right and to left) is attacking the person of “the ruling Pontiff”, BB? We would surely not allow that on CP&S, would we? For better or for worse, we all here recognise Pope Francis as the Holy Father. Criticism of his misguided words or actions as mentioned in this article is not an attack on the Papacy or on his person. For real attacks on the HF you’ll have to look at other sites.

    How about this instead?…

    “Any Catholic who attacks Christ’s One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church and all Her Divinely-inspired teachings needs their head examining IMHO.”

    Much more accurate – huh?

    Or you might find yourself siding with the likes of wicked Popes Alexander VI, John XII, Benedict IX, or Stephen VI.😯

  15. JabbaPapa says:

    Bruvver Daimain should have just eaten a box of cupcakes with custard instead of posting such obnoxious & unsubstantiated vitriolic claims against the Holy Father.

  16. mmvc says:

    You may not agree with him, Jabba, but had he stuck only to cupcakes and custard we wouldn’t have had a gem like this on the scheduled papal visit to Sweden for next year’s Reformation celebration:

    “And only the very sharp-eared will hear the rattle of decapitated skeletons – both Catholic and Protestant – turning in their graves.

    The Reformation jamboree will pay lip service to the ‘tragedy’ of the 16th-century martyrs. But if those bones could speak, I suspect they’d say the real tragedy is the spectacle of Catholic, Lutheran and Anglican leaders glossing over the doctrines for which they died.”

  17. GC says:

    maryla, oh my aching sides! I can’t believe Dr Thompson has been so forthright.

  18. Brother Burrito says:

    I enjoyed Fr Z’s fisking of Damian’s article, particularly his closing comments.

    As you all know, I am an unreserved fan of PF. What I particularly like about him is his unpredictability. To me this makes him very like unto his Creator, the God of surprises. When a human person has been given such enormous power to change the world, as PF has, AND he proves impossible to second-guess, then literally miracles might happen at any moment.

    The world needs miracles of Grace like we all need oxygen. Bring ’em on, I say.

    PF’s sanctity cannot be legitimately debated until after he is dead. In the meantime, ad multos annos!

  19. Brother Burrito says:

    Hi GC, long time no chat.

    I’m sure Damian is only doing his usual thing by stirring up the errh custard. I could ring him and ask him, but on such professional matters, he is as inscrutable as a doctor defending his private practice, ahem.

    If I might make a more general comment, I would say that despair is a most un-Catholic attitude. To assume the world is ending because the ruling Pontiff seems to be out of one’s control seems to me to be a bit neurotic. (That wasn’t aimed at you personally GC, just the Traddie Catholisphere in general).

    The ruling Pontiff is only obedient to Almighty God. That is in his job description. Yes he must listen to his flock, but no, he mustn’t be commanded by them. That way lies anarchy and disaster.

    Never before in history has the Vicar of Christ been under such scrutiny by the world media. He only has to cough or hiccup, and it is front page news. He is partly to blame for this as he is not naturally shy like Benedict is. This scrutiny amplifies and distorts his simple voice.

    Has he not from the first warned us against the evil power of gossip-mongering? I think blogs can fall under that spell very easily. The power to control debate by having a strong and seductive voice is irresistible n’est-ce pas?

    Oh look, it is getting late in my part of the world. I must go to bed. I hope I have sweet dreams, I need them. God bless everyone.

  20. JabbaPapa says:

    It turns out that bruvver Daimain’s claims aren’t even true in the first place, as the Holy Father’s visit to Sweden is to take place in 2016, whereas the anniversary of that ghastly event will take place in 2017.

    whooops-a-daisy & carry on not believing every exciting Press story about Pope Francis !!

  21. mmvc says:

    According to Vatican Radio the celebrations of ‘that ghastly event’ which are to continue throughout 2017 kick off on 31st October in Lund, Sweden, with a joint ecumenical commemoration in which the pope will participate. So yes, getting the year wrong was a minor slip up but certainly not enough to discredit Damian’s journalistic integrity IMO (didn’t you say somewhere that we all make mistakes, Jabba?) The fact remains that Pope Francis is travelling there “to mark the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s first furious broadside against Rome”.

  22. kathleen says:

    mmvc @ 19:44 yesterday

    Great link, dear Maryla, thank you. It will have the liberals and Protestants all over the blogosphere gnashing their teeth in rage.😆

    “Liberal Catholics, liberal Protestants and the secular media will cheer when he does so” (i.e., celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.)*

    Let them; it’s all that one could expect. I say three cheers for Damian and the inimitable Father Z for not fearing to criticise error when it is staring one in the face, and for defending Christ and His Church from traitors and destroyers, whoever they may be.

    * Do true Catholics really believe our thousands of martyrs, who refused to betray the One True Church, died for nothing?? Because that is what the Reformation brought us in its destruction of Christendom in Europe. Evil fruit. And look what the last 500 years of European history has led to: to umpteen Protestant denominations all teaching their own man-made rules, and the greatest loss of Faith ever known as a consequence!

    Shame on any Catholic who thinks the 500th Reformation anniversary is anything to ‘celebrate’!

  23. JabbaPapa says:

    Here’s some more from the Pope concerning the major Miracles of our Lord :

    http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/2016/06/09/water-into-wine-was-a-way-to-reveal-the-fathers-love-says-francis/

    Jesus’s first miracle of changing water into wine expresses his invitation to share in the joy of the new covenant and reminds people to do as he commands, Pope Francis has said.

    The miracle also shows how he transformed the law of Moses – represented by water destined for ritual purification – into the joy of the Gospel, which is represented by wine, he said.

    “The wedding at Cana is much more than a simple account of Jesus’s first miracle,” the Pope told those gathered in St Peter’s Square.

    The story sheds the first light on the “whole mystery of Christ” – who he really is and why he came – as well as helping open “the hearts of the disciples to the faith,” he said.

    The miracles, or what John the Evangelist calls “signs”, were never meant to astonish people, but to “reveal the Father’s love”, the Pope said.

    Jesus performing his first miracle at the wedding feast in Cana is greatly significant, the Pope said. “Jesus manifests himself as the bridegroom of the people of God” and reveals the nature and depth of this relationship: “It is a new covenant of love.”

    “It’s like the story of two people in love,” he said. God and humanity seek each other out, they meet, they celebrate and they love each other.

    “The Church is Jesus’s family into which he pours his love. It is this love that the Church safeguards and wants to offer everyone.” Living a Christian life is the response to God’s love, he added.

    It’s possible that in these seemingly opposite characterisations of these Miracles of Bread and Wine, the Pope wished to express that the Eucharist is where our work towards God and the Lord’s Work towards us meet in radical transubstantiation, the fruits of our labour made by the Lord as well as by our works and Worship into the Real Presence in Eucharist of the very Nature of the Earthly Church.

    One thing I do like very much about Pope Francis, and that he has in common BTW with Pope John Paul I and Pope Saint Pius X, is that he’s constantly bringing us into a manner of reflection about the Dogma and the Tradition of the Catholicity and the Faith, so that we are constantly being required to think about the (undeniable) Truth of these things in ways that we’re often unused to, as a kind of dynamic illumination of the dogma instead of a dusty teaching by rote that might betray the Living Nature of the Logos Himself, our Lord the Christ, into some manner of Pharisaic or (worse) Modernist or Protestant diminution of the Revelation into whichever little man-made box of unconverted prêt-à-penser.

  24. Robert says:

    The Canna miracle takes and inorganic substance Water and transforms it into Wine. But as experts will know Wine has a built in History. That of the Grape and the particular variety of Vine, the climate the Grape was subject to (very important in determining the vintage of the Best Wine) and even the geographical (soil etc) location of the Wine.
    There is a difference by the way between inorganic water and its organic counterpart.
    The Wine was Created with a built in History. All things are possible to God.

  25. Robert says:

    Jabba Sorry but I don’t understand a word of this
    “..One thing I do like very much about Pope Francis, and that he has in common BTW with Pope John Paul I and Pope Saint Pius X, is that he’s constantly bringing us into a manner of reflection about the Dogma and the Tradition of the Catholicity and the Faith, so that we are constantly being required to think about the (undeniable) Truth of these things in ways that we’re often unused to, as a kind of dynamic illumination of the dogma instead of a dusty teaching by rote that might betray the Living Nature of the Logos Himself, our Lord the Christ, into some manner of Pharisaic or (worse) Modernist or Protestant diminution of the Revelation into whichever little man-made box of unconverted prêt-à-penser. ..”

    I thought it was at Our Lady’s request?
    It was also the start of Our Lord’s public Life that would end in His Passion?
    So that the New Wine and His Blood etc.. of the New Covenant.
    Its good of course to especially remind of the New Covenant that replaced the Old and especially the Revelation of the Trinity which was unknown before.
    Its true the more you meditate on the things of God the more depth and details you see. This is especially true of the Rosary. The things of God are deceptively simply and each and All take you towards Eternity.

  26. Is Francis sharing wisdom or an egocentric desire to affirm his superiority to how he interprets all that came before him? Were it the first, he would not be interested in trivializing, distorting, and demeaning the concerns of the Catholics he treats as caricatures. Wisdom does not need to beat up strawmen.

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