Today we sing Cardinal Newman’s hymn, “Lead, Kindly Light,” which his own life embodied and faith made bold: “I do not ask to see the distant scene, one step enough for me.”

 

Image result for lead kindly light picture

 

Fr. Rutler’s Weekly Column

Over forty years ago, I told a wise Protestant theologian that I had been reading the Apologia pro Vita Sua of John Henry Newman (1801-1890). He warned me that it is “a dangerous book.”

That was just the sort of advice that makes a young thinker all the more eager to read it. And so I did, and so did countless others whose lives were changed by this book, whose passages are some of the most beautiful in the English language, and whose author’s the thoughts considering the psychology of the soul are undying.

Newman wrote that book in four weeks, standing at his upright desk in Birmingham, England, in response to a personal attack on his integrity: “I have been in perfect peace and contentment; I never have had one doubt. I was not conscious to myself, on my conversion, of any change, intellectual or moral, wrought in my mind . . . but it was like coming into port after a rough sea; and my happiness on that score remains to this day without interruption.”

Today Newman is to be canonized in Rome, a tribute to his unsurpassed gifts of grace as theologian, historian, writer, poet, preacher and, most of all, a pastor of souls. While preaching and writing immortal words, he also was meticulous in running the Oratory school he founded, even making costumes for school plays, paying coal bills, and playing his fiddle in the school orchestra.

In his honor and in thanksgiving for the Church’s recognition of his holiness, of which the angels never were in doubt, we shall dedicate today a shrine for him in our church. As with all that we try to do in our church, this sculpture is the work of one of our own parishioners. Newman foresaw with uncanny prescience the various challenges of our own day, and this monument should be a reminder to pray for his intercession on behalf of our local church and the Church Universal in a time of spiritual combat, which is a lot like what he faced in his own age.

To Newman’s great surprise, and even “shock,” the newly elected Pope Leo XIII in 1879 created him a cardinal. He had been so attacked and calumniated for his religious views over many years, that he was satisfied that the “cloud” had finally been lifted. In his acceptance speech he said that his entire life had been consecrated to refuting the doctrine of relativism which held that “Revealed religion is not a truth, but a sentiment and a taste; not an objective fact, not miraculous; and it is the right of each individual to make it say just what strikes his fancy.”

Today we sing Cardinal Newman’s hymn, “Lead, Kindly Light,” which his own life embodied and faith made bold: “I do not ask to see the distant scene, one step enough for me.”

Faithfully yours in Christ,

Father George W. Rutler

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8 Responses to Today we sing Cardinal Newman’s hymn, “Lead, Kindly Light,” which his own life embodied and faith made bold: “I do not ask to see the distant scene, one step enough for me.”

  1. John A. Kehoe says:

    How I* envy the happy people who made it to Rome today for the canonisation of St John Henry Newman. May the prayers of this wonderful saint help to guide each one of us in the path of salvation.

    *We all realise that this isn’t John writing this, don’t we?

  2. carlos10101 says:

    Reblogged this on Carlos Carrasco.

  3. Pingback: Saint John Henry Cardinal Newman – Carlos Carrasco

  4. John A. Kehoe says:

    Surely one of the finest expressions of the Faith can be found in the Dream of Gerontius:

    Sanctus fortis, Sanctus Deus,
    De profundis oro te,
    Miserere, Judex meus,
    Parce mihi, Domine. {327}
    Firmly I believe and truly
    God is three, and God is One;
    And I next acknowledge duly
    Manhood taken by the Son.
    And I trust and hope most fully
    In that Manhood crucified;
    And each thought and deed unruly
    Do to death, as He has died.
    Simply to His grace and wholly
    Light and life and strength belong,
    And I love, supremely, solely,
    Him the holy, Him the strong.
    Sanctus fortis, Sanctus Deus,
    De profundis oro te,
    Miserere, Judex meus,
    Parce mihi, Domine.
    And I hold in veneration,
    For the love of Him alone,
    Holy Church, as His creation,
    And her teachings, as His own.
    And I take with joy whatever
    Now besets me, pain or fear,
    And with a strong will I sever
    All the ties which bind me here. {328}
    Adoration aye be given,
    With and through the angelic host,
    To the God of earth and heaven,
    Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.
    Sanctus fortis, Sanctus Deus,
    De profundis oro te,
    Miserere, Judex meus,
    Mortis in discrimine.

    John didn’t write this post either. He should also familiarise himself with http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/2017/act/11/enacted/en/html

  5. johnhenrycn says:

    My guess is that a former compère (resigned or let go about 5 years ago) of CP&S is making a sockpuppet of the estimable John A. Kehoe, Irish barrister-at-law (hard border division). Asinine.

  6. johnhenrycn says:

    “Asinine” was not intended in reference to John A. Kehoe, nor to any Irishman (afaik)

  7. The Raven says:

    Be kind, JH, our dear friend is unable to respond to your wit.

  8. johnhenrycn says:

    If you are speaking with our friend, please tell him that his pagination for The Dream of Gerontius is off by 10 pages. The passage:

    Sanctus fortis, Sanctus Deus,
    De profundis oro te,
    Miserere, Judex meus,
    Parce mihi, Domine. {327}

    actually appears at page 337 of The Chesterton Review quarterly from which he obviously (to me) cut and pasted it. I hold it this moment in my hands. Sublime photos of The Seven Sisters (Sussex), Blackpool Bay (Devon), Monsal Dale, Chipping Campden (Gloucester) and The Chalk Hills of Surrey are interspersed with the text. I applaud his excellent taste in periodicals, although I doubt he can now afford them, the issue I refer to dating back to before he left England for Spain.

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